Himalaya Fall 2017: Summits and A Death on Manaslu, Final Push Begins on Dhaulagiri.

Sad news from the Nepal this morning, where it is being reported that a climber has died on Manaslu. According to a report from Himalayan Guides, one of the operators on the mountain this season, 46-year old Phillip Harvey of the U.K. died while descending from Camp 3. He was already suffering from the advanced stages of altitude sickness and succumbed to that ailment before his support team could get him to safety.

Little is known beyond that, and of course our condolences go out to Phillip’s friends and family. This was the first death on Manaslu this season, and as the summit push begins, lets hope it is the only one.

Speaking of summits, yesterday was a busy day on the mountain with 23 members of the Seven Summits Trek team reaching the top. That number includes 11 clients (8 Chinese nationals, 2 Koreans, and 1 Indian climber) and 12 Sherpa guides. This group is already back on the descent, even as more teams head to the top.

The Summit Club team moved up to C3 yesterday and plan to continue up to C4 today, with the thought of summiting tomorrow, September 27. There are reportedly a number of other squads that are following a similar story, with most preparing to top out over the next few days. Meanwhile, the Adventure Consultants are dropping back to Base Camp today where they will rest up and then prepare for their own summit bid. That could come as early as this weekend, depending on how fit they are feeling and whether or not the forecast stays clear.

With more than 250 foreign climbers on Manaslu this season, it has been a busier than usual mountain. But, it now appears that things are wrapping up quickly, with most teams now on track to summit over the next few days. That would pretty much put them on schedule, despite the crowded conditions and heavy snows and rains that have hit the area so far this fall.

Finally, over on Dhaulagiri, 78-year old Carlos Soria has left Base Camp on his way up to C1 today. His team is now rested and have a favorable forecast, so they are hoping to reach the summit later this week too. If everything goes according to plan, they should top out no Thursday or Friday, giving the Spaniard his 13th 8000-meter peak. That would leave him with just Shishapangma left to climb.

Stay tuned for more updates. There is still plenty of action to come.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Himalaya Fall 2017: Summits and A Death on Manaslu, Final Push Begins on Dhaulagiri

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Himalaya Fall 2017: Teams Begin Plotting Summit Bids.

The weather in the Himalaya is starting to improve after several days of snow and rain last week. That means that teams are on the move one again as they continue their acclimatization efforts, with some even starting to think about their eventual summit bids.

There has been plenty of rain in Dhaulagiri Base Camp all season long, but things are starting to improve there. So much so that 78-year old Carlos Soria and his team are starting to plan their second summit bid. Their first attempt to climb the mountain was thwarted when they took the wrong path to the top. They have since returned to BC, rested up, and waited out the weather. They now hope to launch their second attempt on the summit later this week.

Meanwhile, over on Manaslu, the teams have also resumed their acclimatization efforts. The weather had kept them at lower altitudes for a few days as well, but now that conditions are improving, the numerous teams on the mountain are eager to get started once again. To that end, the Adventure Consultants have moved up to Camp 2, arriving at that point earlier today, with a few members of the squad actually continuing up to C3 as well. Tomorrow they’ll return to Base Camp for some rest, and will once again look at the forecast to decide their next move. When they go back up the mountain next time, it will be to launch their summit bid.

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Video: Elevations – A High Speed Racing Drone in the Swiss Alps.

A few years ago, drones were a new thing that were just finding their niche for use in daily lives. Today, they are highly specialized devices that can perform a number of different tasks, ranging from filmmaking and photography and surveying to delivering products. Drone racing has also become a growing activity, with fast, maneuverable UAV’s taking to the skies to zip through a predesigned course. In this video, a racing drone is taken into the Swiss Alps to capture some amazing footage, but what begins as a typical flight, quickly turns into a roller coaster ride. Buckle up for this one, it is a fantastic clip with some amazing footage, caught at high speed.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Video: Elevations – A High Speed Racing Drone in the Swiss Alps

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

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With “National Pride” at Stake, Nepal Prepares to Remeasure the Height of Mt. Everest.

Nepal has announced plans to go ahead with a planned survey to remeasure the height of Mt. Everest, citing “National Pride” as a reason it is proceeding with the delicate, time consuming, and costly operation. The surveying expedition is expected to take up to two years to complete, and cost somewhere int he neighborhood of $250,000.

For decades the accepted official height of Mt. Everest has stood at 8848 meters (29,029 ft), although there has been some controversy surrounding that figure. For instance, the Chinese measured the summit in 2005 as 8844 meters (29,015 ft), with surveyors claiming that was the altitude without snow on the summit. Meanwhile, a 1999 GPS survey by the National Geographic Society lists the height as 8850 meters (29,035 ft), further confusing the subject.

So what’s the real height? Nepal is embarking on an ambitious plan to find out, and has rebuked any outside help. The country that claims dominion over the South Side of the mountain has never measured the height of Everest on its own, and is now intent on doing the fact that neighboring India has already announced its own plans to measure the mountain again as well.

The impetus behind these recent plans to survey the mountain once again come following the devastating earthquake that hit Nepal back in 2015. It is believed that the seismic forces that caused that disaster may have also caused Everest to shrink in height. Most reports indicate that the mountain probably only lost an inch or so, but that was enough to spur on talks of remeasuring the peak, with India first announcing its plans to send a survey team, and Nepal quickly following.

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Happy 40th Anniversary Outside Magazine!

2017 marks the 40th anniversary of Outside magazine, and the venerable periodical has been celebrating all year long with a number of special articles. But now, the Outside website has launched an official anniversary section that is a stroll down memory lane for those of us who have read it for years, serving as an amazing look back at some of the most memorable stories of all time.

On the webpage for the 40th anniversary you’ll find reflections on what it was like to publish Jon Krakauer’s seminal work Into Thin Air, how the magazine survived a tumultuous time in the late 90’s when many of its writers moved on, and much more. You’ll find current stories about an antarctic expedition that went terribly wrong, a look at whether or not Lance Armstrong actually regrets doping, and a story about Reinhold Messner and Peter Habler climbing Everest without oxygen for the very first time. You’ll also find a nice piece on the the stories that have inspired the Outside team, and a thoughtful letter from the editorreflecting on the past 40 years.

For fans of the outdoors, adventure, and exploration there is a lot to take in on this single webpage alone. In fact, almost every story there is worth a read and you’ll probably find yourself finishing up one, just to move on to the next. Some of the articles are classics from Outside‘s past, while others are fascinating stories of things happening right now. In short, it is a wonderful mix of why we have come to love the magazine so much over the past 40 years. For four decades it has found ways to educate, fascinate, and inspire. Hopefully that won’t end anytime soon.

Here’s to 40 more years Outside!

Check out the 40th anniversary page here.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: –  Happy 40th Anniversary OutsideMagazine!

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20 Great Trekking Routes From Around the Globe.

Already hiked the Inca Trail, added Kilimanjaro to your resume, and walked to Everest Base Camp? Looking for some new trekking routes to explore? Never fear, National Geographic has you covered with a wonderful list of 20 epic trails from around the world that can quench your thirst for adventure.

The list includes some well known routes, like the GR20 on Corsicaand the Snowman Trek in Bhutan, as well as some lesser known trekking trails, such as the Israel National Trail and the North Drakensberg Traverse in South Africa. You’ll find familiar routes like the Great Himalaya Trail in Nepal, and ones that are much lesser known, but just as unique, like the West Highland Way in Scotland. In short, there are hikes in just about every corner of the globe, and for every kind of backpacker, travelers, or explorer.

Each of the entries on the Nat Geo list is accompanied by a fantastic photo to illustrate the scenery found there, as well as information on the route’s length, the best time to go, and why you should go at all. There is also a detailed description of what to expect while walking the route, with handy tips on weather, level of difficulty, camping options, and much more.

If you follow my blog with any regularity, it will probably come as no surprise that my favorite hike on the list is Shackleton Route on South Georgia Island, a place I was luck enough to visit a few months back. The trail was the one taken by Ernest Shackleton and his men as they made their way across the island back in 1916, and while I only got the chance to walk a short section of it, it is indeed utterly spectacular. I’d love to go back and do the full route at some point, although logistics are an issue when getting to and from South Georgia. Still, if you ever have the opportunity to do this walk yourself, I highly recommend it.

Check out the entire list here of epic trails here.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – 20 Great Trekking Routes From Around the Globe

** see also: –  https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

Video: Climbing Big Walls in Madagascar.

Earlier today I posted a story about three Belgian climbers completing a free ascent of the Central Tower in Torres del Paine. Two of those climbers were Sean Vilanueva and Siebe Vanhee, both of whom you’ll find in this video as they travel to Madagascar to climb big walls in that country. While there, they discovered a completely unclimbed line on Tsaranoro Atsimo and set out to see if they could make the first ascent. This is the story of that expedition.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Video: Climbing Big Walls in Madagascar

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

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