Google and Discovery Join Forces for Virtual Reality Travel Series.

Tech giant Google and media outlet Discovery Channel have joined forces to create what promises to be quite the interesting travel experience. The new Discovery TRVLR series uses virtual reality to take viewers on a 38-episode, globe spanning, adventure that visits all seven continents. The episodes will be available on YouTube and the Discovery VR website, as well as in the Discovery VR app for iOS and Android, as well as various VR headsets.

The actual series isn’t set to debut officially until November 3, but according to the show’s website, the first season will take viewers to Auckland, Hanoi, Mexico City, Yerevan, Cape Town, La Paz and Antarctica. Along the way, they’ll get to meet locals, see the landscapes, and immerse themselves in the culture without ever leaving home.

The show will feature 7 chapters, each of which focuses on one of the continents. The chapters for North and South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia will be made up of six episodes each, while Antarctica will see two episodes. Viewers will be introduced to four different personalities on each continent, the Guru, the Renegade, the Entertainer and the Explorer.

Of course, there is no substitute for real travel and actually visiting these places, but this looks like a promising use of VR technology. I’m told that it isn’t just a 360º video shot using a special camera, but will be fully immersive stereoscopic virtual reality, which should make for an impressive experience, particularly on higher end devices.

Production of the series reportedly has taken more than three months, with some shooting and editing still ongoing. The recent earthquake in Mexico disrupted the crew to a degree, and there are still other locations to capture in VR before the show makes its official debut in a few weeks time.

You can check out the teaser trailer Discovery TRVLR below. Then grab yourself a pair of Google Daydream VR goggles or even Google Cardboard, and get ready to span the globe.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Google and Discovery Join Forces for Virtual Reality Travel Series

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

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50 Parks to Visit in 50 U.S. States.

The U.S. has always been at the forefront of creating public lands for its citizens and foreign visitors to explore. After all, the country was the first to designate a national park when Yellowstone was first created way back in 1872. Today, there are fantastic parks to explore in every state in the Union, and Popular Mechanics wants to help you discover the best ones.

In a slideshow entitled “50 States, 50 Parks” readers will go through each state in alphabetical order, with the individual slides providing some information on the absolute best park to visit at that particular destination. So, for example, in Alaska you’ll learn that Denali National Park has earned a spot on the list, which is no small feat when you consider the fantastic national parks that exist there. The slide not only contains a brief explanation for what makes Denali special, but an epic photo from the location as well.

Other great parks that make the cut include Grand Canyon (Arizona), Yosemite (California), Starved Rock State Park (Illinois), and Mammoth Cave in Kentucky. I’ll leave the remaining 45 parks for you to discover, as it is a lot of fun to see what choices were made for each state.

It’s no secret that I’m a huge fan of the national parks, but there are some pretty spectacular state parks to be found as well. Thankfully, this list doesn’t count them out and you’re likely to discover plenty of new places to add to your “must visit” list. Check out the entire slideshow here.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – 50 Parks to Visit in 50 U.S. States

** see also: –

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Video: A Timelapse of the Italian Dolomites.

Located in northern Italy, the Dolomites offer a spectacular setting that is strikingly different from the Alps. Rugged and dramatic, these mountains look more like something you’d find in Patagonia rather than Europe. In this clip, we take a journey into the Dolomites, both during the day, and at night. You’ll get a brief glimpse at what makes this place so special, and if you haven’t been there yourself, it will definitely be added to your bucket list.

https://player.vimeo.com/video/231079200[4K] Sleepless In The Dolomites – Tiemo Weidemann (Panasonic GH4 / DJI Phantom 4 PRO)from Tiemo Weidemann on Vimeo.Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Video: A Timelapse of the Italian Dolomites

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

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Best Xmas presents.

Magic Christmas time is also the time for presents which you will be able to find under the Christmas tree.

Below you can find some examples of presents that whoever is keen on climbing, trekking and expeditions into the Himalayas, will like the most.

# La Sportiva Batura Boots: Comfort and Performance.

Weight: 2 pounds, 2.7 ounces

MSRP: $500

La Sportiva has created another fine technical boot with the new Batura. I’ve used the Nuptse in the Himalaya, the Nepal Top all over the North Cascades and Ouray, the Trango Ice Evo and Women’s Trango Evo GTX in Patagonia and at home in the San Juans. I’ve been happy with all of these La Sportiva models, which tend to fit narrow feet, like mine, especially well. I’m psyched on the new Batura because it fills the gap between the warmth of the Nuptse, as a quasi-double boot, and the technical performance of the Nepal Top or Evo. Its weight-to-warmth ratio sets it apart from the pack of other boots I’ve used over the years.

… more on – La Sportiva Batura Boots: Comfort and Performance.

# Vasque M-Finity boots bring you back home.

Author of post : Angela Hawse.

For me, a good mountain boot not only has to climb well, it has to get me to the climb. I’m not carrying Vasque M-Finitya boot on my back, I’m going to wear it all day, there and back. I checked out the Vasque M-Finity on the 13,770-foot Grand Teton during the early part of last summer.

My clients, sporting their sticky rubber approach shoes, looked on with a bit of anxiety as I laced up my flashy mountain boots at the trailhead.

“Just testing,” I assured them, “You’ll be fine.”

But I wondered if I’d “be fine” on the 5,000-foot hump up to the lower saddle and the 7,000-foot descent back down to the car tomorrow in the beasts. No doubt, the boots were a tad overkill for the summer hike, but a test drive is a test drive.

… more on – Mountaineering Boots – Vasque M-Finity. /Version english and polish/

# Vasque Ice 9000.

Author of post : Julia Niles

I put these boots to the test on Denali. They sailed me up and down the mountain attached to vasque-ice-9000snowshoes, skis and crampons. I wore them nonstop for 21 days (when I wasn’t sleeping or lucky enough to be in my down booties) and never got a single blister. Nothing broke off despite the abuse I gave them: kicking blocks of ice while building walls, playing glacier Frisbee and lacing as tight as possible at times.

… more on – Mountaineering Boots – Vasque Ice 9000.

* source: –  https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/equipment/

** see also – Men’s Journal Presents the 20 Best Gifts for Adventurers.

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A Holiday Shopping Guide for Adventure Travelers.

All week long I’m sharing some holiday shopping suggestions for gifts for the outdoor and adventure lover in your life. On Monday I posted some gift ideas for the hiker and backpacker and yesterday I offered some suggestions for the outdoor athlete. Today, we’ll take a look at the top gifts for the adventure traveler with a wide variety of items to make life on the road more enjoyable.

Yeti Panga 75 Duffel ($350)
There are waterproof duffel bags and then there is the Yeti Panga 75 duffel. As you would expect from a duffel built by Yeti, this bag is practically indestructible. And thanks to the use of the hydrolock zipper, the bag can be completely submersed in water and still keep its contents completely dry. Whether your paddling the Amazon or hiking to Everest Base Camp, the Panga will keep your gear safe, secure, and dry.

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Would You Pay $95,000 to Climb Everest in Just 4 Weeks?

Over the past few years, Adrian Ballinger’s Alpenglow team has set down the ground work for what has become known as “flash” expeditions to Everest and other big peaks. These climbs take a fraction of the time that more traditional expeditions require, but cost considerably more as a result. Now, another outfitter is getting into the fast-climb game, and they’ve set an unprecedented price level too.

Alan Arnette has all the details on the new Furtenbach Adventures Everest Expedition, which promises to get climbers to the summit in just four weeks time, and offer them unlimited oxygen along the way, all for the low, low price of just $95,000. Yep, you read that right. In an era where more Nepali companies are leading teams to the mountain at a discounted price, this new experience from Furtenbach will set you back nearly $100k.

So how do they do it? Both Alpenglow and Furtenbach get their clients set up with a proper fitness program to prepare for the climbs, but more importantly they use oxygen tents prior to departing for the Himalaya to start the acclimatization process long before the mountaineers step foot on Everest. As a result, they arrive in Nepal and Tibet much better prepared for the altitude, cutting down on the number of trips up and down the mountain and even the trek to Base Camp.

Alpenglow has had good success with this strategy in recent years, so it only seems natural that someone else would emulate it. In contrast to the 4 week climb offered by Ballinger, now Furtenbach Adventures, most people looking to summit Everest spend about two months in the Himalaya. The pitch here is that time is money, and that these expeditions save their clients as much as four weeks away from home. They also pitch these trips as being safer, since they don’t spend nearly as much time climbing to high camps to acclimatize.

Alan goes into more detail on these types of expeditions, sharing his thoughts throughout the article. He also interviews Lukas Furtenbach about this new venture as well, with the German offering his thoughts on the science behind the use of oxygen tents, how it helps his clients to prepare, and much more.

Is this the future of mountaineering? Only time will tell. But, that future is starting look more fragmented with the rich client paying exorbitant fees to reach the summit, while an increasing number of climbers choose the “budget” route instead.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: –   Would You Pay $95,000 to Climb Everest in Just 4 Weeks?

** see also: –  How Much Does It Cost To Climb Mt. Everest?

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The Himalayan Database Will Soon be Available for Free.

When it comes to climbing the big mountains in Nepal – and lesser extent Tibet – The Himalayan Database is the definitive record for everything has been accomplished there over the past 50 years. The information contained in the database has been meticulously compiled by Ms. Elizabeth Hawley for five decades, and soon all of those records will be available to the general public online for free.

In an announcement posted to The Himalayan Database website reads as follows:

“Version 2 of the Himalayan Database will be released to the general public at no charge via download from this site in early November 2017 after the Spring 2017 update to the database is completed. Owners of the current version will need to download and upgrade to the new version in order to gain access to future updates and changes.”

The data covers all expeditions to the Himalaya starting in 1905 and running through 2003. It covers more than 340 different mountains across Nepal, and along the border with Tibet. According to the database website “the database is searchable by peak, climber, expedition, nationality, season, mortality rates and causes and more.”

Updated data from 2004 through 2016 is available via the Himalayan Database website, with the 2017 data to be compiled and added later. The combined information from the downloadable database and the online resource, marks the most comprehensive collection of information on mountaineering expeditions ever assembled.

Over the past few years, Ms. Hawley has eased into retirement, after maintaining the database on her own for decades. Much of her work has been taken up by German climber and journalist Billi Bierling, who along with a few other dedicated people. have been collecting and compiling the data.

Now, this resource will become available to anyone who wants to access it and search its information. For those of us who do regular reporting on the Nepal and the expeditions that visit there, it is a welcome addition to help us with that coverage. But, beyond that, it should prove very interesting for anyone who follows the mountaineering scene closely.

Watch himalayandatabase.com for an update soon.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – The Himalayan Database Will Soon be Available for Free

** see also: –

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