Himalaya 2017: Adventure Consultants Alone on Manaslu, Bill Burke Back For Round 3.

With October now officially here, the climbing season in the Himalaya – at least for the big commercial teams – is starting to wind down. With Tibet closed for the season, Manaslu took center stage throughout the autumn with a slew of summits last week. Now, just one team remains on the mountain, as most have completed their expeditions and have begun the trek for home.

According to Alan Arnette, Manaslu has seen somewhere in the neighborhood of about 200 summits so far this fall. The largest of the teams on the mountain was organized by Seven Summits Treks, who managed to put 90 climbers on top, including about 45 Sherpas. Other squads at much more modest and manageable numbers, with the majority of them topping out over the final three days of last week.

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Himalaya Fall 2017: Summits Continue on Manaslu, An Update From Lhotse.

Great weather has set the stage on Manaslu, where dozens of climbers have either summited over the past few days or are on their way up now. There has already been a high success rate on the mountain this fall, and there are still more summits to come. It appears that the current weather window will now extend into next week, giving every team an opportunity to have a crack at reaching the top.

Right now, the Seven Summits Treks team, which is the largest on the hill, have had the most success. Alan Arnette reports that they may have put as many as 90 people on the summit this season. Most are now back in BC and preparing to head home. Yesterday, the Summit Climb team also put a sizable group not he summit, and they are returning to Base Camp today as well. It is unclear at this time how many members of that squad topped out.

oday, the Arnold Coster team reached the summit, putting seven clients on top, along with eight Sherpas. They are working in conjunction with Seven Summits, who now reports just two Mexican climbers remain on their client list to make their final push.

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Himalaya Fall 2017: It’s Over on Dhaulagiri, Manaslu Teams On The Move.

More news from the Himalaya today, where things are developing rapidly at this point in the season. Now that the end of September is in sight, most of the larger commercial squads will be looking to wrap up their expeditions and get ready to go home. With that in mind, many of the teams are currently on the move, with summit bids set to take place over the next few days.

We’ll start with an update from Dhaulagiri, where yesterday Carlos Soria and his team set off for Camp 1 with the hope of making a summit bid over the next few days. But, unfortunately when they reached that point on the mountain they discovered heavy snow from the storm that hit the mountain last week. That fresh snow is very dangerous, as the team dodged several avalanches just on the climb up to C1 alone. It would also make it extremely difficult to break trail, and since they are still recovering form their previous attempt on the summit, they’ve made the choice to pull the plug on the expedition and go home. Carlos and company have already descended back to Base Camp and are now preparing to head home.

Over on Manaslu, the teams are crawling all over the mountain. There is a major summit push underway right now, with a number of teams heading up, including the Summit Climb squad. In their latest dispatch the indicate that at least some of their clients topped out this morning, and are on their way back to Camp 4 for a rest, with plans to descend back to BC tomorrow. No further news is available at this time.

The Adventure Consultants have also posted a new dispatch with word that their entire team is back in Base Camp after a successful acclimatization rotation. Most of the group went as high as Camp 2 and spent a couple of nights there, while a few went up to C3 for a night as well. Yesterday, they dropped back to BC and are now resting and preparing for a summit bid of their own. The forecast will dictate when that will happen, but given that they’ll need a few days to regain their strength, I wouldn’t expect them to set out for the top until this coming weekend at the earliest. By then, most of the other teams should have wrapped up their operations and will be preparing to depart for home, giving them a clear shot to the summit.

While the season does seem to be quickly winding down at this point, there will still be a few climbs to follow throughout the rest of the fall. While the big commercial teams always try to wrap things up early, there will no doubt be a few independent squads to follow along the way. We’ll keep our ears to the ground for those expeditions too, as they are often on the cutting edge in terms of pushing new routes and trying new things.

More to come soon.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Himalaya Fall 2017: It’s Over on Dhaulagiri, Manaslu Teams On The Move

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Himalaya Fall 2017: Summits and A Death on Manaslu, Final Push Begins on Dhaulagiri.

Sad news from the Nepal this morning, where it is being reported that a climber has died on Manaslu. According to a report from Himalayan Guides, one of the operators on the mountain this season, 46-year old Phillip Harvey of the U.K. died while descending from Camp 3. He was already suffering from the advanced stages of altitude sickness and succumbed to that ailment before his support team could get him to safety.

Little is known beyond that, and of course our condolences go out to Phillip’s friends and family. This was the first death on Manaslu this season, and as the summit push begins, lets hope it is the only one.

Speaking of summits, yesterday was a busy day on the mountain with 23 members of the Seven Summits Trek team reaching the top. That number includes 11 clients (8 Chinese nationals, 2 Koreans, and 1 Indian climber) and 12 Sherpa guides. This group is already back on the descent, even as more teams head to the top.

The Summit Club team moved up to C3 yesterday and plan to continue up to C4 today, with the thought of summiting tomorrow, September 27. There are reportedly a number of other squads that are following a similar story, with most preparing to top out over the next few days. Meanwhile, the Adventure Consultants are dropping back to Base Camp today where they will rest up and then prepare for their own summit bid. That could come as early as this weekend, depending on how fit they are feeling and whether or not the forecast stays clear.

With more than 250 foreign climbers on Manaslu this season, it has been a busier than usual mountain. But, it now appears that things are wrapping up quickly, with most teams now on track to summit over the next few days. That would pretty much put them on schedule, despite the crowded conditions and heavy snows and rains that have hit the area so far this fall.

Finally, over on Dhaulagiri, 78-year old Carlos Soria has left Base Camp on his way up to C1 today. His team is now rested and have a favorable forecast, so they are hoping to reach the summit later this week too. If everything goes according to plan, they should top out no Thursday or Friday, giving the Spaniard his 13th 8000-meter peak. That would leave him with just Shishapangma left to climb.

Stay tuned for more updates. There is still plenty of action to come.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Himalaya Fall 2017: Summits and A Death on Manaslu, Final Push Begins on Dhaulagiri

** see also: –

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Himalaya Fall 2017: Teams Begin Plotting Summit Bids.

The weather in the Himalaya is starting to improve after several days of snow and rain last week. That means that teams are on the move one again as they continue their acclimatization efforts, with some even starting to think about their eventual summit bids.

There has been plenty of rain in Dhaulagiri Base Camp all season long, but things are starting to improve there. So much so that 78-year old Carlos Soria and his team are starting to plan their second summit bid. Their first attempt to climb the mountain was thwarted when they took the wrong path to the top. They have since returned to BC, rested up, and waited out the weather. They now hope to launch their second attempt on the summit later this week.

Meanwhile, over on Manaslu, the teams have also resumed their acclimatization efforts. The weather had kept them at lower altitudes for a few days as well, but now that conditions are improving, the numerous teams on the mountain are eager to get started once again. To that end, the Adventure Consultants have moved up to Camp 2, arriving at that point earlier today, with a few members of the squad actually continuing up to C3 as well. Tomorrow they’ll return to Base Camp for some rest, and will once again look at the forecast to decide their next move. When they go back up the mountain next time, it will be to launch their summit bid.

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With “National Pride” at Stake, Nepal Prepares to Remeasure the Height of Mt. Everest.

Nepal has announced plans to go ahead with a planned survey to remeasure the height of Mt. Everest, citing “National Pride” as a reason it is proceeding with the delicate, time consuming, and costly operation. The surveying expedition is expected to take up to two years to complete, and cost somewhere int he neighborhood of $250,000.

For decades the accepted official height of Mt. Everest has stood at 8848 meters (29,029 ft), although there has been some controversy surrounding that figure. For instance, the Chinese measured the summit in 2005 as 8844 meters (29,015 ft), with surveyors claiming that was the altitude without snow on the summit. Meanwhile, a 1999 GPS survey by the National Geographic Society lists the height as 8850 meters (29,035 ft), further confusing the subject.

So what’s the real height? Nepal is embarking on an ambitious plan to find out, and has rebuked any outside help. The country that claims dominion over the South Side of the mountain has never measured the height of Everest on its own, and is now intent on doing the fact that neighboring India has already announced its own plans to measure the mountain again as well.

The impetus behind these recent plans to survey the mountain once again come following the devastating earthquake that hit Nepal back in 2015. It is believed that the seismic forces that caused that disaster may have also caused Everest to shrink in height. Most reports indicate that the mountain probably only lost an inch or so, but that was enough to spur on talks of remeasuring the peak, with India first announcing its plans to send a survey team, and Nepal quickly following.

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Himalaya Fall 2017: Duble Amputee Summits Mera Peak, Messner in Base Camp

It has been another active few days in the Himalaya, where we are closing in on the halfway point of the fall climbing season. The teams are in the midst of their acclimatization rotations in anticipation of summit bids to come, but are keeping a close eye on weather forecasts to determine their next move. But, as usual, there is a lot happening, and not all if it is centered around the big 8000 meter peaks.

We’ll start with an update on Hari Budha Magar, the double-amputee who set his sights on Mera Peak this fall. The former British Gurkha soldier has reached the summit on that mountain, becoming the first person to do so following the loss of his legs above the knee. He, and four other members of the team, topped out on the 6476-meter (21,246 ft) mountain at 9:02 AM local time on Tuesday.

Magar, who lost his legs while fighting in Afghanistan, used this expedition as training for an upcoming attempt on Everest. He now plans to attempt to summit the world’s highest mountain in the spring of 2018. He has now descended off of Mera Peak and is resting before proceeding for home.

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