Video: Skier Falls into a Crevasse, Records it All on GoPro.

Ever wonder what its like to fall into a crevasse? If so, this video will help quell that curiosity. It features skier Jamie Mullner, who fell into a big crevasse while skiing this past December. Fortunately for him he had his GoPro recording and everything turned out okay, but it is a bit of a scary situation, especially as his friends work to find him and get him out. Definitely a place that most of us want to avoid. Check it out below.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Video: Skier Falls into a Crevasse, Records it All on GoPro

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

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First Aid Certification.

Author of post :  Blake Herrington.

CBR title

Last summer I joined my friend Sol Wertkin on a new route in Central Cascades of Washington State.

I wrote an article about our trip, and it was just published in the Washington-based outdoorsy magazine, Adventures Northwest.If you are in the area, you can get a copy of this magazine for free at places such as climbing, hiking, biking, or paddling shops, as well as supermarkets and college campuses.

I scanned the article and posted it online, visible by clicking these thumbnail images:

The climbing world (Colorado in particular) has been in a state of shock over the deaths of Jonny Copp, Micah Dash, and Wade Johnson, apparently caused by an avalanche in China. I had never met two of the climbers, but had seen Micah give a slideshow and climbed with him for a fun day in Red Rocks this past March. A more enthusiastic and excited climber could not be found.

* Source :  – http://blakeclimbs.blogspot.com/

** Previous story  : – Beginner’s Guide to Climbing.

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Beginner’s Guide to Climbing – Indoor Rock Climbing.

Indoor Rock Climbing – Meet the World of Plastic.

Learn how to climb safely and get proper instruction inside one of the climbing gyms in your area.Climbing with Mike _200

by Mike

INDOOR ROCK CLIMBING — Climbing indoors is just what it sounds like—you simply are climbing indoors instead of climbing outdoors. Simple-sounding, but the term indoor climbing covers from closet and basement “woodies” to enormous and elaborate climbing walls in gyms.

INDOOR ROCK CLIMBING 2 Indoor rock climbing centre. (www.cliffhanger.com.au)

You can build your own woodie with some plywood and screws, turning a room in your house or a wall in the attic or basement into your own training area. All indoor climbing is basically the same because you are climbing on manufactured holds bolted to plywood.

The plywood in gyms and home gyms alike are attached to a metal or wood frame and holds are bolted or screwed on. The holds can be turned or rotated to any which way desired, to turn a bucket hold into a sloper, or a crimper into an under cling.

indoor rock climbing 1a Indoor rock climbing centre. (www.musclememory.ca)

The holds can be positioned to make a “route” which can be marked with tape to show which holds can be touched and which ones are off-limits. Textured paint is available to give the wall a sandstone appearance and allow smearing with your climbing shoes.

Routes are usually an arms-width wide and can run to the top of the wall or even traverse the entire rock-climbing-holdslength of the wall. A really neat feature of indoor climbing is that a route can be changed to make the climb as easy or as hard as you want it to be; the holds can even be put up to duplicate a tough route you may be working on outside. This allows you to practice inside when the weather turns sour, or if winter affects your neck of the woods.

Climbing gyms are fabulous places to start learning how to climb. Some gyms have classes you can take with qualified and sometimes even certified instructors. Gyms let you practice using climbing gear and learn proper technique in a safe environment.

Most climbing gyms have routes that are top roped, but some have walls you can practice leading on. Leading a route in a gym can be much less nerve-wracking than your first lead outside; there is a big difference between leading a route and top roping the same route.

You may notice that some climbing gyms have campus routes. Campus boards are thin slats of wood put up the wall in a ladder-like fashion. The climber grips the campus board with his finger tips and essentially pulls up to the next rung. No feet are used, so as a word of caution to the beginning climber—make sure you have adequate finger strength before you start on the campus boards. Finger injuries are all too common and irreversible nerve and tendon damage may occur. Taping finger joints can help prevent this, but avoiding campus boards for the first little while would be best.

Indoor climbing is its own sport in the vast world of climbing with many climbing competitions and even cash prizes. There are many climbers who don’t care to climb outside or live where boulders and cliffs don’t exist. Indoor climbing is a great way to practice tough moves or just hang out when the weather isn’t cooperating. Also, many hours of fun and learning are to be had climbing indoors. Enough said…to the plastic!!

* Source : – http://www.outdoorswithdave.com/climbing/indoor_rock_climbing.htm

** Previous story  :  – Beginner’s Guide to Climbing.

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Beginner’s Guide to Climbing – Rock Climbing Gear List.

Rock climbing gear can be expensive, but you can buy in these small packages as your skill improves.Climbing with Mike _200

by Mike

ROCK CLIMBING GEAR LIST — This is a simple rock climbing gear list of essentials you will need to get started climbing. You will also want to add to this list from the Basic Gear List.

Bouldering

• Climbing shoes
Chalk Bag & Chalk
Crash Pad
Toothbrush (for cleaning chalk encrusted holds)
Snacks & Water

Indoor Climbing

• Harness
Chalk Bag
Belay Device & Locking Carabiner
Climbing Shoes
Backpack

Sport Climbing – Same as Indoor Climbing, but add:

• Quickdraws (10-12)
Rope (10.5mm X 60 M)
Rope Bag
60 cm Nylon or Spectra Slings (1-2)
120 cm Nylon or Spectra Slings (1-2)
Oval or Locking Carabiners (2-3)
Helmet

Rock climbing gear can be expensive, but you can buy in these small packages as your skill improves.

by Mike

ROCK CLIMBING GEAR LIST — This is a simple rock climbing gear list of essentials you will need to get started climbing. You will also want to add to this list from the Basic Gear List.

Bouldering

• Climbing shoes
Chalk Bag & Chalk
Crash Pad
Toothbrush (for cleaning chalk encrusted holds)
Snacks & Water

Indoor Climbing

• Harness
Chalk Bag
Belay Device & Locking Carabiner
Climbing Shoes
Backpack

Sport Climbing – Same as Indoor Climbing, but add:

• Quickdraws (10-12)
Rope (10.5mm X 60 M)
Rope Bag
60 cm Nylon or Spectra Slings (1-2)
120 cm Nylon or Spectra Slings (1-2)
Oval or Locking Carabiners (2-3)
Helmet

Traditional Climbing – Same as Indoor and Sport, but add:

• 1-2 Sets of Stoppers
1 Set of Hexes
1-2 Sets of Camming Devices
10 or more 60 cm Nylon Slings
20 or more Carabiners
20 Feet of Tubular Webbing
Cordelette (7 mm X 20 Feet Accessory Cord)
Nut Tool (for those stuck pieces)

* Source : – http://www.outdoorswithdave.com/climbing/rock_climbing_gear_list.htm

** Previous story  : – Beginner’s Guide to Climbing.

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Beginner’s Guide to Climbing – Climbing with Mike : all posts.

1.  Mike’s Top 10 Climbing Tips and Techniques.

2.  Beginner’s Guide to Climbing – New Rock Climbers Start Here Part I.

3.  Beginner’s Guide to Climbing – New Rock Climbers Start Here Part II.

4.  Beginner’s Guide to Climbing – Bouldering : Shoes, Chalk and Rock.

5.  Beginner’s Guide to Climbing – Rock Climbing Ratings.

6.  Beginner’s Guide to Climbing – Aid Climbing.

7.  Beginner’s Guide to Climbing – Rock Climbing Gear List.

8.  Beginner’s Guide to Climbing – Indoor Rock Climbing.

* Source : – http://www.outdoorswithdave.com/climbing/beginners_guide.htm

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Beginner’s Guide to Climbing – Aid Climbing.

Aid Climbing – Rock Climbing with a Little Help.

Challenging and nerve wracking — this style of climbing was definately invented for gear junkies and the brave of heart. Climbing with Mike _200

by Mike

AID CLIMBING — Aid climbing involves the upward progression by the use of gear or another mechanical means. This means the section of cliff you are climbing on just doesn’t have good enough holds to afford climbing with feet and hands like you would if you were free climbing. Aid Climbing

In order to continue going up, you would have to get better at climbing without holds or put in a piece of protection and use it to get you up further. Most of the time, before you start a climb, you would know beforehand if the route would involve any aid climbing, but on a first ascent that could be a different story.

Say, for instance, a climber is going up a crack, protecting it with trad gear and he comes to a place where the crack pinches down to a thin sliver not even big enough for a little pinky finger. Five feet above him the crack opens back up again. What he would do to get up to the bigger part of the crack is to insert a piece of gear small enough to seat comfortably in the crack, clip a sling to the piece and stand up in the sling.

At this point he may be able to reach up into the bigger part of the crack and move up. If he was too far away to reach, he would repeat the process until he could reach up into the wider part of the crack. What may have started out to be a traditional climb just turned into an aid climb.

On big wall routes, aiding is the order of the day. Some wall climbs will involve 15 to 20 pitches of aid climbing. Most of these routes will have very little parts that can be free climbed; instead each and every move up the miniscule cracks must be aided with gear.

Aid climbers must carry massive amounts of gear. While being in the mere presence of that much gear may sound really great, carrying all of it up the cliff is not. Sometimes as much as 65 pounds of gear must be hauled up the route by the climber. To make this daunting task more bearable, gear has been designed to keep climbers comfortable.

Padded gear slings allow the big wall climber to clip all of those cams, nuts, hexes, pitons and carabiners to loops on the slings to help organize all that gear and speed up placements. Etriers or aiders are ladder-like loops made of webbing for the climber to stand in. Aiders are clipped to each piece that is placed and are moved up with the climber.

Although different types of rock make for varying difficulties of aid climbing, the process of placing the gear, clipping an aider to it and standing up on the piece of protection to reach the next gear placement is much the same.

Aid climbers must face the reality of a complete reliance on the gear they use. Free climbers trust only their hands and rock shoes to get them up the cliff, while aid climbers are relying totally on the gear and how well it has been placed in the crack to further the journey upward. This dependence on sometimes rickety gear can be very tough on the nerves.

Sometimes, an aid climber will come to a blank section of the climb that will involve the use of hooks to climb up to where a solid piece of protection can be placed. Hooking may well be the scariest moment when aiding, because the chances of the hook slipping from its purchase are just too much to think about!

Pendulums are sometimes employed to reach other crack systems, as well as tension traverses where the climber will have the belayer play out slack in the rope while he slowly inches his way over to another part of the crack. As a last resort, bolts or rivets may be placed to also aid through blank sections of the cliff.

Aid climbing has a rating system to describe how hard the climb is and how much danger is involved, as well as a grading system to let the climber know how long the climb might take. The ratings follow the Yosemite Decimal Rating System which is outlined in the article Climbing Ratings. Here are the rating and grading systems as shown in Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills:

Class 6: Aid Climbing

A0 or C0
A1 or C1
A2 or C2 or A2+
A3 or C3 or A3+
A4 or A4+
A5 or A5+
A6 (Theoretical)

Grading System

GRADE I: Normally requires several hours, can be of any technical difficulty.

GRADE II: Requires half a day, any technical difficulty.

GRADE III: Requires a day to do the technical portion, any technical difficulty.

GRADE IV: Requires a day to do the technical portion, the hardest pitch is usually 5.7 or harder.

GRADE V: Requires a day and a half, the hardest pitch is 5.8 or harder.

GRADE VI: A multi-day excursion requiring difficult free climbing and/or aid climbing.

For the most part, most beginning climbers will rarely ever do anything harder than a GRADE I climb. The grade system is helpful for climbers who are planning to climb something that is hundreds or even thousands of feet high and need to know how much time they will be spending on the wall. When the system mentions the hardest pitch it means the hardest section of the climb.

A pitch is the length of a standard climbing rope. The shortest common length is 50 meters (165 feet) and the standard length today is 60 meters (200 feet). Since climbing by today’s standards originated in Europe, most climbing measurements are done with the Metric System.

While most beginning climbers may never do an aid climb, big wall climbing and other aid climbing are fun to read about. Having knowledge of what goes into doing an aid climb, what gear is used and how it is implemented can carry over into other styles of climbing. As for the gear junky, aid climbing is as good as it gets!

* Source : – http://www.outdoorswithdave.com/climbing/aid_climbing.htm

** Previous story  :  – Beginner’s Guide to Climbing.

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Beginner’s Guide to Climbing – Rock Climbing Ratings.

Rock Climbing Ratings – from 5.0 to Spiderman.

Understand how climbs are rated and learn more about the Yosemite Decimal Rating System. Climbing with Mike _200

by Mike

CLIMBING RATINGS — In the 1950’s a group called the Sierra Club modified an old system which they used to rate climbs according to their difficulty. This system is now called The Yosemite Decimal Rating System.  Climbing Ratings

The YDRS breaks climbing down into classes and grades. Nearly every climbing guide uses this system. Beginning climbers can use this system to find climbs that are challenging but not too difficult; preventing them from venturing out onto something too hard that might lead to injury.

All climbing, hiking, crawling, and so on can be broken down into these classes. A brief explanation of the classes will describe what type of climbing might be encountered.

Class 1 : Walking, on an established trail.

Class 2 : Hiking, up a steep incline, possibly using your hands for balance.

Class 3 : Climbing up a steep hillside; a rope is not normally used.

Class 4 : Exposed climbing, following a ledge system for example. A rope would be used to belay past places where a fall could be lethal.

Class 5 : This is where technical rock climbing begins. A 3 point stance (Two hands and a foot or two feet and a hand) is needed. A rope and protection are needed to safeguard a fall by the person leading. Any unprotected fall from a class 5 climb would be harmful if not fatal. Class 5 climbs are subdivided into categories to give more detail.

5.0-5.4: Climbing up a ramp or a steep section with good holds.

5.5-5.7: Steeper, more vertical climbing, but still on good holds. These routes are also easily protected.

5.8 +/- Vertical climbing on small holds. A + means that the climbing is more sustained like a 5.9, but the route would still be considered a 5.8. If you see a – after the 5.8 rating it means that the climb only has one or two moves like a solid 5.8 would have, but more resembles a 5.7. The + and – are becoming outdated and most guide books have discontinued their use.

5.9 +/- This rating means that the climb might be slightly overhung or may have fairly sustained climbing on smaller holds. With practice the beginning climber can climb in the 5.9 range quickly and with confidence.

5.10 a, b, c, d Very sustained climbing. A weekend climber rarely feels comfortable in this range unless they do go EVERY weekend or has some natural talent. The difference between a 5.10 b and a 5.10 c is very noticeable. Most likely the climbs are overhung with small holds and are sustained or require sequential moves.

5.11 a, b, c, d This is the world of the dedicated climber. Expect steep and difficult routes that demand technical climbing and powerful moves.

5.12 a, b, c, d The routes in this range are usually overhanging climbs requiring delicate foot work on thin holds or long routes requiring great balance on little holds.

5.13 a, b, c, d If you can climb upside down on a glass window, these climbs are right up your alley.

5.14 a, b, c, d These climbs are among the hardest in the world.

5.15 a This is as hard as climbing gets, folks. Keep in mind that very few climbers can actually climb at this level, although Spiderman eats these climbs for breakfast.

Climbs are rated by the hardest move on the route. A person who is a solid 5.8 climber theoretically should be able to climb through the crux (the hardest part of the climb) on any route rated 5.8 regardless of the type of rock or area they climb at. That is the theory anyway. Unfortunately, climbs are not rated by a committee of climbers so a particular climb can be off as much as a letter grade or more. Having said that, the majority of climbs you will do will be right on the money.

Since the destiny of every mountain, cliff, boulder, or pebble is to become like the gravel you walk on to get to the climb, know that ALL RATINGS ARE SUBJECTIVE! Weathering of the rock, the sun, wind and extreme temperatures all contribute to making climbs harder or easier than the rating given to a climb the first time it is established.

While routes are given ratings so you don’t bite off more than you can chew, try climbing at your level and then a little bit more. You might surprise yourself and actually get up the route in relatively good form.

If you are having trouble with a particular climb, don’t blame the rating. Train a little harder, do a few extra pushups at night, and give it a go again. Climbing is about setting goals and working to achieve them.

The last rating class of the Yosemite Decimal Rating System is class 6, which is considered aid climbing. Aid climbing has its own rating system that does not use decimals like class 5. Instead it uses A to abbreviate Aid and then a number which indicates how challenging the moves are and the commitment level involved on the climb. For more information see the article on Aid Climbing.

* Source : – http://www.outdoorswithdave.com/climbing/climbing_ratings.htm

** Previous story  :  – Beginner’s Guide to Climbing.

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