Gear Closet: Salewa Mountain Trainer Mid GTX Boots Review.

In need of a new pair of technical hiking boots for your upcoming adventures? If so, you’ll want to add the new Mountain Trainer Mid GTX from Salewa to your list of potential options. This lightweight, yet sturdy and durable, boot offers excellent performance on a variety of terrains, and will keep your feet comfortable and dry no matter where the trail takes you.

Boasting a traditional suede upper, paired with a Gore-Tex lining, and a Vibram outsole, the Mountain Trainer has been built for alpine pursuits. The boot is perfect for scrambling over ice and snow, mud, rocks, and other surfaces you’re bound to run into on your treks, offering good stability and support in both dry and wet conditions.

Perhaps the most impressive element of the Mountain Trainer is their impressive fit. When I initially took them out of the box, my first reaction was that the boots felt a bit stiff, but after wearing them around the house for awhile, they loosened up nicely and were soon broken in for the trail. But, Salewa has taken great care to ensure that these boots are incredibly comfortable to wear for extended periods of time, and to that end the insoles not only offer great cushioning, but they actually mold themselves to fit the specific contours of your feet as you were them longer. The result is a shoe that gets increasingly comfortable as you hike. The lacing system even allows the wearer to dial in an even better fit, selecting the tension as needed.

The “Mid” version of the Mountain Trainer offers terrific ankle support as well, although if you prefer a low cut, Salewa does offer that version of the shoe too. Personally, I prefer having a bit of extra protection for my ankles when hiking more difficult and rocky trails, but the added support does come at the expense of extra weight. These boots tip the scales at 1.4 pounds, which means that they fall squarely into the average weight category. But when you consider the traction, comfort, and protection they provide, it feels like the Mountain Trainers actually perform above their weight class.

I’ve put these boots to the test in several different parts of the country this spring – including Idaho and California – and have found them to be an excellent boot in a variety of different conditions. On each hike, not only did my feet stay very comfortable, they also didn’t overheat when things started to get more active. That said, they may not be the best option for warm-weather adventures, but you don’t often run into those types of conditions at altitude, even during the summer. The Gore-Tex lining on the Mountain Trainer does a reasonably good job of remaining breathable while also keeping moisture out, but its very existence makes this a boot that is bested used in cooler temps for sure.

So far, durability has been quite good on the Mountain Trainers. I’ve seen one or two reviews online that have indicated that that wasn’t the case over the long haul, but I can honestly say that my pair of boots look none the worse for wear, even after putting them through their paces on mud, snow, and rocks. In fact, I’d be hard pressed to find a scuff mark or blemish on them anywhere at this point, which generally leads me to believe that they should hold up fine over the course of time.

The Mountain Trainer Mid GTX is a serious boot for serious hikers and peak baggers. It was built to go places where the average trekker probably won’t wander, and provide solid performance and protection along the way. As such, it carries a price tag of $249.95, which is on the pricer end of the scale for hiking boots. But those who push themselves to the limit on the trail will appreciate everything that this boot brings to the table, which easily separates itself from lesser boots that are designed for light hiking and a day in town, rather than alpine pursuits in remote backcountry. If you don’t need that kind of performance, you may be better served looking elsewhere. But if you’re an outdoor athlete who likes to explore far off the beaten path, this is a great boot for you. You won’t be disappointed in what you find here, as the Mountain Trainer is an amazing blend of comfort, security, and stability that isn’t found in just any piece of footwear.

Buy at REI.com.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Gear Closet: Salewa Mountain Trainer Mid GTX Boots Review

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/gear/

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Video: BASE Jumping From The Lost City of Petra in Jordan.

The Lost City of Petra is truly one of the great marvels of the world. It is an amazing destination in Jordan that simply has to be seen to be believed. In this video, we get a completely new look at the place however, as BASE jumper Miles Daisher jumps from the top of “The Treasury,” the most iconic building in the entire site. As you’ll see, it is quite a drop zone.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Video: BASE Jumping From The Lost City of Petra in Jordan

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

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Video: Skier Falls into a Crevasse, Records it All on GoPro.

Ever wonder what its like to fall into a crevasse? If so, this video will help quell that curiosity. It features skier Jamie Mullner, who fell into a big crevasse while skiing this past December. Fortunately for him he had his GoPro recording and everything turned out okay, but it is a bit of a scary situation, especially as his friends work to find him and get him out. Definitely a place that most of us want to avoid. Check it out below.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Video: Skier Falls into a Crevasse, Records it All on GoPro

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

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Traveling to California – The Lost Coast Trail with Tepui Tents.

As we round out the week, just a quick note on blog updates for next week. I’ll be starting the month of May with a quick trip to California where I’ll be testing out a Tepui Tents rooftop tent while spending a couple of days hiking on the Lost Coast Trail. This gives me the opportunity to not only see a place that I’ve heard so much about, but also test out some gear as well. I’ve been wanting to checkout Tepui’s shelters for some time now, and this will be a great chance to do just that.

I depart early on Monday and will be back early on Thursday, so there is a good chance there won’t be any updates until next Friday. But should a big story break, there is a chance I’ll be able to post something to the blog before then. In the meantime, have a great weekend, enjoy the spring weather, and I’ll be back before you know it.

After this trip, I don’t have anything planned for a few weeks, which means I should be around for summit season in the Himalaya. Always an exciting time of year for sure.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Traveling to California – The Lost Coast Trail with Tepui Tents

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

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Video: Pro Surfer Skis Giant Waves in Hawaii.

Yes, you read that headline right. This video takes us out to Hawaii where we find pro surfer Chuck Patterson taking on the notoriously large waves at Pe’ahi aka “Jaws.” Rather than riding his surfboard, he instead chooses to ski Jaws instead, complete with boots, poles, and the works. Surprisingly, this goes fairly well, although I wouldn’t recommend it to just anyone. Wild stuff for sure.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Video: Pro Surfer Skis Giant Waves in Hawaii

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

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Everest Climbing Gear – Then and Now.

National Geographic has another interesting article and photo gallery up today, this time taking a look at the past and present gear used on Everest. The slideshow contains a number of fantastic images, and each one focuses on a particular topic, such as “communications” and “insulation layers,” with information what was used when Hillary and Norgay completed the first ascent, versus the gear that the rank and file mountaineers are using now.

Today’s climbers are outfitted with highly technical apparel, a host of gadgets, and gear that offers an amazing weight-to-performance ratio. Everything from the boots they wear to the tents they stay in have improved dramatically over the past 60+ years. With all of the advanced fabrics and space-age materials at our disposal, it is easier to climb lighter, faster, and more comfortably than ever before, which is part of the reason so many more people are making the attempt.

So just how different was it back in 1953? In the Nat Geo article we learn that Hillary and Norgay couldn’t use wireless communications higher up on the mountain, so they communicated by laying out their sleeping bags in a particular pattern that could be seen below. Today, walkie-talkies, sat phones, satellite messengers, and even cell phones can be used to communicate from any point on Everest, including the summit.

Similarly, the tents used on the first ascent where heavy and bulky. Those shelters were made from cotton, and were often crowded, uncomfortable, and very heavy. In contrast, today’s tents are surprisingly strong, lightweight, and warm, even at higher altitudes. Every aspect and component of a tent has been upgraded, making them easier to carry and assemble, even when the weather turns bad.

The story is a fun one and well worth a read for Everest fans and gear junkies alike. Lots of good information here comparing climbing now to then. You’re likely to come away with even more respect for those early Everest climbers.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Everest Climbing Gear – Then and Now

** see also – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/gear/

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Himalaya 2017: Everest Summiteer Cory Richards Shares Intimate Challenges of His Life.

In the mountaineer world Cory Richards is known as quite a success story. He is an accomplished climber and adventure photographer who has topped out on some of the world’s tallest peaks, including Everest. Back in 2011, he was even part of the first team to complete a winter ascent of Gasherbrum II, joining Simone Moro and Denis Urubko on the summit. To all outside appearances, Richards looked like a guy who had the world at his feet, knocking off tall peaks in remote parts of the world and delivering some of the most stunning images of those places. But, as it turns out, he was also battling a lot of demons, which hid just below the surface threatening to bring it all crashing down.

In a new article for National Geographic, Richards opens up about the challenges he has faced in his personal life, revealing that he first ran into trouble as a young teenager who began using drugs and found himself homeless on the street at the age of 13. That would alienate him from his family for a time and send him on a downward spiral that would leave a lasting impression on any young person. But, he would eventually crawl out of that situation and reunite with his family.

Years later, while climbing Gasherbrum II, he would get caught in an avalanche, narrowly avoiding death. Understandably that would lead to Richards developing a case of PTSD that would begin to haunt him on and off the mountain. He started to drink, he battled addiction issues, he got married but struggled to stay faithful. The difficulties continued to mount, even as his career really started to take off. Eventually, it would all come crashing down. He lost his wife, he left the multimedia studio he helped found, he turned away from friends, and it looked like everything would implode.

Then, last year, climber Adrian Ballinger reached out to Richards to see if he would be interested in climbing Everest together. The two men traveled to Nepal and went to work on the highest mountain on the planet, using social media in unique ways to document their climb. On summit day, Ballinger was forced to turn back, but Richards continued upward, reaching the summit alone. It was then that he knew he had to confront the demons that he faced and get his life together.

In the article, Cory shares some very personal stories about his internal battles, how he got to the lowest point in his life, and what it has been like to crawl back out of that spot again. He gives us a stark, honest look at himself with the hopes that his story might help others, even as sharing the truth helps him too. It is an interest read and a cautionary tale for sure.

Check it on in its entirety here.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Himalaya 2017: Everest Summiteer Cory Richards Shares Intimate Challenges of His Life

** see also: –Himalaya Spring 2017: Season Progressing On Schedule.

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