Video: A Drone’s Eye View of the World From 33,000 Feet.

Drones continue to evolve, become smarter and more powerful. Case in point, is this video in which Russian drone makers set a new record for highest flight, taking their remote controlled aircraft up to a height of 10 km (33,000 feet). As you can imagine, the views from up there are pretty spectacular. The clip is fairly long, but gives you a good idea of what it takes to reach such altitudes, and what the drone can “see” as it it goes up.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Video: A Drone’s Eye View of the World From 33,000 Feet

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

– Trekking – posts on my site :

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : GOKYO, KALA PATTAR and EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK (19 days).

Everest Base Camp – CLASSIC treks. / Version polish and english /

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : EVEREST HIGH VALLEY – Travel Guide. /Version english/

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Adventure Tech: Suaoki G500 Portable Power Station.

Yesterday we took a look at a new portable power bank designed specifically with drone users in mind. Today, we have a more traditional model of personal power station that delivers even more energy to your base camp, while offering pretty much all of the outlets you could possibly need to keep your expedition powered up for days at time.

The new Suaoki G500 Portable Power Station recently launched on Indiegogo and has garnered a lot of attention thanks to its massive battery, relatively light weight, and high level of versatility. This device features a 500 watt-hour lithium-ion battery, which translates to roughly 137,700 mAh. That’s enough to power your smartphone for up to 90 hours or a laptop for as much as 45 hours. The G500 is even strong enough to recharge drone batteries, run a mini-refrigerator, or power an LCD projector too. In short, it is a powerful and useful tool for mobile professionals, family camping, or expedition teams heading into remote areas.

The G500 is equipped with two AC wall outlets, 2 quick-charging USB-A ports, a single quick-charging USB-C port, two 12-volt DC ports, a 12-volt car port, and an Anderson Powerpole connector. That should cover just about any kind of device you might bring with you when you hit the road, including phones, tablets, laptops, cameras, GPS devices, and headlamps.

The power station itself ships with an AC adapter to recharge it via a wall outlet and a DC charger for plugging into the cigarette lighter in your car. The G500 can be recharged in the field using a solar panel as well, allowing it to serve as a solar generator on extended expeditions. Recharging at home or in your car takes about 8-10 hours, while the time required using the sun varies depending on the solar panel, how much direct sunlight it receives, and so on.

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Google and Discovery Join Forces for Virtual Reality Travel Series.

Tech giant Google and media outlet Discovery Channel have joined forces to create what promises to be quite the interesting travel experience. The new Discovery TRVLR series uses virtual reality to take viewers on a 38-episode, globe spanning, adventure that visits all seven continents. The episodes will be available on YouTube and the Discovery VR website, as well as in the Discovery VR app for iOS and Android, as well as various VR headsets.

The actual series isn’t set to debut officially until November 3, but according to the show’s website, the first season will take viewers to Auckland, Hanoi, Mexico City, Yerevan, Cape Town, La Paz and Antarctica. Along the way, they’ll get to meet locals, see the landscapes, and immerse themselves in the culture without ever leaving home.

The show will feature 7 chapters, each of which focuses on one of the continents. The chapters for North and South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia will be made up of six episodes each, while Antarctica will see two episodes. Viewers will be introduced to four different personalities on each continent, the Guru, the Renegade, the Entertainer and the Explorer.

Of course, there is no substitute for real travel and actually visiting these places, but this looks like a promising use of VR technology. I’m told that it isn’t just a 360º video shot using a special camera, but will be fully immersive stereoscopic virtual reality, which should make for an impressive experience, particularly on higher end devices.

Production of the series reportedly has taken more than three months, with some shooting and editing still ongoing. The recent earthquake in Mexico disrupted the crew to a degree, and there are still other locations to capture in VR before the show makes its official debut in a few weeks time.

You can check out the teaser trailer Discovery TRVLR below. Then grab yourself a pair of Google Daydream VR goggles or even Google Cardboard, and get ready to span the globe.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Google and Discovery Join Forces for Virtual Reality Travel Series

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

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Download The Adventure Podcast on Your Favorite Platform.

As I write this, I am busily working away at editing the second episode of The Adventure Podcast. We hope to have the second episode out very soon. But before we release it, my cohost David Adlard and I wanted to let everyone know that the show is available on your favorite platform for listening to podcasts now. So, no matter if you enjoy listening on an iOS device, Android phone or tablet, or just on your computer, you should be able to subscribe to our feed and automatically get new episodes.

For those who want to listen to our new little venture, here’s where you can get the episodes:
  • Subscribe in iTunes/iOS Podcasts by clicking here.
  • On Android use Google Play Music to get the show here.
  • If you listen on Stitcher, you’ll find The Adventure Podcast here.
  • We also have an RSS feed set up for the show here.
Also, if you’ve had a chance to listen to the show, we’d love your feedback. We can be reached on Twitter at @adventure_pod or by email at theadventurepod@gmail.com. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and questions on our Facebook page as well.
Thanks to everyone who sent us feedback on Episode 0. We learned a lot while making it and the first  real episode will be better for it. We have some big plans for the show moving forward, and Dave and I hope you’ll come along for the ride.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Download The Adventure Podcast on Your Favorite Platform

** see also: –

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A Holiday Shopping Guide for Adventure Travelers.

All week long I’m sharing some holiday shopping suggestions for gifts for the outdoor and adventure lover in your life. On Monday I posted some gift ideas for the hiker and backpacker and yesterday I offered some suggestions for the outdoor athlete. Today, we’ll take a look at the top gifts for the adventure traveler with a wide variety of items to make life on the road more enjoyable.

Yeti Panga 75 Duffel ($350)
There are waterproof duffel bags and then there is the Yeti Panga 75 duffel. As you would expect from a duffel built by Yeti, this bag is practically indestructible. And thanks to the use of the hydrolock zipper, the bag can be completely submersed in water and still keep its contents completely dry. Whether your paddling the Amazon or hiking to Everest Base Camp, the Panga will keep your gear safe, secure, and dry.

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The Himalayan Database Will Soon be Available for Free.

When it comes to climbing the big mountains in Nepal – and lesser extent Tibet – The Himalayan Database is the definitive record for everything has been accomplished there over the past 50 years. The information contained in the database has been meticulously compiled by Ms. Elizabeth Hawley for five decades, and soon all of those records will be available to the general public online for free.

In an announcement posted to The Himalayan Database website reads as follows:

“Version 2 of the Himalayan Database will be released to the general public at no charge via download from this site in early November 2017 after the Spring 2017 update to the database is completed. Owners of the current version will need to download and upgrade to the new version in order to gain access to future updates and changes.”

The data covers all expeditions to the Himalaya starting in 1905 and running through 2003. It covers more than 340 different mountains across Nepal, and along the border with Tibet. According to the database website “the database is searchable by peak, climber, expedition, nationality, season, mortality rates and causes and more.”

Updated data from 2004 through 2016 is available via the Himalayan Database website, with the 2017 data to be compiled and added later. The combined information from the downloadable database and the online resource, marks the most comprehensive collection of information on mountaineering expeditions ever assembled.

Over the past few years, Ms. Hawley has eased into retirement, after maintaining the database on her own for decades. Much of her work has been taken up by German climber and journalist Billi Bierling, who along with a few other dedicated people. have been collecting and compiling the data.

Now, this resource will become available to anyone who wants to access it and search its information. For those of us who do regular reporting on the Nepal and the expeditions that visit there, it is a welcome addition to help us with that coverage. But, beyond that, it should prove very interesting for anyone who follows the mountaineering scene closely.

Watch himalayandatabase.com for an update soon.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – The Himalayan Database Will Soon be Available for Free

** see also: –

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Everest Climbing Gear – Then and Now.

National Geographic has another interesting article and photo gallery up today, this time taking a look at the past and present gear used on Everest. The slideshow contains a number of fantastic images, and each one focuses on a particular topic, such as “communications” and “insulation layers,” with information what was used when Hillary and Norgay completed the first ascent, versus the gear that the rank and file mountaineers are using now.

Today’s climbers are outfitted with highly technical apparel, a host of gadgets, and gear that offers an amazing weight-to-performance ratio. Everything from the boots they wear to the tents they stay in have improved dramatically over the past 60+ years. With all of the advanced fabrics and space-age materials at our disposal, it is easier to climb lighter, faster, and more comfortably than ever before, which is part of the reason so many more people are making the attempt.

So just how different was it back in 1953? In the Nat Geo article we learn that Hillary and Norgay couldn’t use wireless communications higher up on the mountain, so they communicated by laying out their sleeping bags in a particular pattern that could be seen below. Today, walkie-talkies, sat phones, satellite messengers, and even cell phones can be used to communicate from any point on Everest, including the summit.

Similarly, the tents used on the first ascent where heavy and bulky. Those shelters were made from cotton, and were often crowded, uncomfortable, and very heavy. In contrast, today’s tents are surprisingly strong, lightweight, and warm, even at higher altitudes. Every aspect and component of a tent has been upgraded, making them easier to carry and assemble, even when the weather turns bad.

The story is a fun one and well worth a read for Everest fans and gear junkies alike. Lots of good information here comparing climbing now to then. You’re likely to come away with even more respect for those early Everest climbers.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Everest Climbing Gear – Then and Now

** see also – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/gear/

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