Traveling to California – The Lost Coast Trail with Tepui Tents.

As we round out the week, just a quick note on blog updates for next week. I’ll be starting the month of May with a quick trip to California where I’ll be testing out a Tepui Tents rooftop tent while spending a couple of days hiking on the Lost Coast Trail. This gives me the opportunity to not only see a place that I’ve heard so much about, but also test out some gear as well. I’ve been wanting to checkout Tepui’s shelters for some time now, and this will be a great chance to do just that.

I depart early on Monday and will be back early on Thursday, so there is a good chance there won’t be any updates until next Friday. But should a big story break, there is a chance I’ll be able to post something to the blog before then. In the meantime, have a great weekend, enjoy the spring weather, and I’ll be back before you know it.

After this trip, I don’t have anything planned for a few weeks, which means I should be around for summit season in the Himalaya. Always an exciting time of year for sure.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Traveling to California – The Lost Coast Trail with Tepui Tents

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/video/

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Everest Climbing Gear – Then and Now.

National Geographic has another interesting article and photo gallery up today, this time taking a look at the past and present gear used on Everest. The slideshow contains a number of fantastic images, and each one focuses on a particular topic, such as “communications” and “insulation layers,” with information what was used when Hillary and Norgay completed the first ascent, versus the gear that the rank and file mountaineers are using now.

Today’s climbers are outfitted with highly technical apparel, a host of gadgets, and gear that offers an amazing weight-to-performance ratio. Everything from the boots they wear to the tents they stay in have improved dramatically over the past 60+ years. With all of the advanced fabrics and space-age materials at our disposal, it is easier to climb lighter, faster, and more comfortably than ever before, which is part of the reason so many more people are making the attempt.

So just how different was it back in 1953? In the Nat Geo article we learn that Hillary and Norgay couldn’t use wireless communications higher up on the mountain, so they communicated by laying out their sleeping bags in a particular pattern that could be seen below. Today, walkie-talkies, sat phones, satellite messengers, and even cell phones can be used to communicate from any point on Everest, including the summit.

Similarly, the tents used on the first ascent where heavy and bulky. Those shelters were made from cotton, and were often crowded, uncomfortable, and very heavy. In contrast, today’s tents are surprisingly strong, lightweight, and warm, even at higher altitudes. Every aspect and component of a tent has been upgraded, making them easier to carry and assemble, even when the weather turns bad.

The story is a fun one and well worth a read for Everest fans and gear junkies alike. Lots of good information here comparing climbing now to then. You’re likely to come away with even more respect for those early Everest climbers.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Everest Climbing Gear – Then and Now

** see also – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/gear/

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Traveling to California – The Lost Coast Trail with Tepui Tents.

As we round out the week, just a quick note on blog updates for next week. I’ll be starting the month of May with a quick trip to California where I’ll be testing out a Tepui Tents rooftop tent while spending a couple of days hiking on the Lost Coast Trail. This gives me the opportunity to not only see a place that I’ve heard so much about, but also test out some gear as well. I’ve been wanting to checkout Tepui’s shelters for some time now, and this will be a great chance to do just that.

I depart early on Monday and will be back early on Thursday, so there is a good chance there won’t be any updates until next Friday. But should a big story break, there is a chance I’ll be able to post something to the blog before then. In the meantime, have a great weekend, enjoy the spring weather, and I’ll be back before you know it.

After this trip, I don’t have anything planned for a few weeks, which means I should be around for summit season in the Himalaya. Always an exciting time of year for sure.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Traveling to California – The Lost Coast Trail with Tepui Tents

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/travel/

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Nat Geo Posts 2017 Spring/Summer Gear Guide.

Now that April is all but behind us, it is pretty safe to say that spring is in full swing and summer isn’t all that far off either. Of course, that means it is time to head back outside an enjoy all of the activities that the warmer months have to offer. Of course, the changing of the seasons is also the perfect excuse to add some new gear to your arsenal as well, and National Geographic is here to help.

The Nat Geo Adventure website had posted its Spring/Summer 2017 Gear Guide, offering up 20 new products that you’ll want to have at your disposal this year. As usual, the list includes a wide variety of items ranging from clothing to shoes to tents and much more. If you’re in the market for some gear, chances are you’ll find a good suggestion here on what you should consider buying.

Amongst the items making the cut are the new Suunto Spartan GPS watch, the Sugoi Zap cycling jacket, and  the Voormi River Run hoody, which I’ve also reviewed on this blog. Other products that earned a spot on the Nat Geo list include the Nano-Air jacket from Patagonia, the Nemo Wagontop 4P tent, and the Gregory Paragon 48 backpack.

This is, of course, just a taste of the items that are recommended by Nat Geo’s expert gear tester. There are plenty of other products on the list for you yet to discover. So go gear up and head outside. I’m sure you’ll find plenty of good ways to put your new toys to the test.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Nat Geo Posts 2017 Spring/Summer Gear Guide

** see also: – https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/gear/

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Backpacker Shares Their Favorite Tents of 2017.

Autor : Kraig Becker

A few days ago I posted a story from Popular Mechanics that shared their picks for the 7 best camping and backpacking tents. Not to be outdone, Backpacker magazine has also shared their thoughts on the subject, publishing their selection for the 12 best tents of 2017 instead. And since it is time for spring hiking and camping outings, I thought it would be a good time to take a look at their suggestions.

In testing these new shelters, Backpacker called in a large group of testers. All told, 31 people participated in the tent test, spending 247 nights outdoors and hiking 1029 total miles. Along the way, one tester faced 55 mph (88 km/h) winds, while others spent 4 consecutive nights in the rain. One even camped above 11,500 ft (3505 meters) in an effort to put these tents through their paces. In other words, the selection of the top tents was no small affair, and the list is definitely comprised of the best camp shelters available today.

So, which tents made the cut? As usual, I won’t spoil the entire list, but will share a few of interest. For instance, Cotopaxi’s Techo 3 and Inti 2 both earned a spot on Backpacker’s rundown, which is a strong showing for a company that just introduced its first models. REI’s updated Quarter Dome 2 also got the nod, as did the Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2.

This is just a small sampling of the tents that made the cut and there are 8 others for you to discover as you look through Backpacker’s list. Which one works best for you probably depends on your individual needs and budget, but in reality you probably can’t go wrong with any of the options here. Obviously the team of testers really put these tents through the ringer, and as a result you can bet that these are the best new options on the market at the moment.

If you’re ready to go shopping for a new tent this spring, do yourself a favor and give this story a look. Chances are, you’ll discover some new choices you didn’t even consider and you might end up with a better hiking shelter than you first thought.

* source: – Backpacker Shares Their Favorite Tents of 2017

** see also : –  Everest — Gear For The Expedition.

–  https://himalman.wordpress.com/category/equipment/