Himalaya Spring 2017: Kilian Jornet Moves Up Speed Record Attempt as Chinese Play Politics with Permits.

Autor : Kraig Becker

As expected, the spring 2017 Himalayan climbing season is delivering all kinds of interesting stories and plot lines to follow. In addition to a record number of climbers on Everest, there are plenty of other expeditions to follow throughout the region. But just as many teams are getting settled into their respective base camps in the mountains, the Chinese have begun imposing permit restrictions that are causing some climbers to rethink their plans and make last minute adjustments to their schedules.

ExWeb has posted more details on the latest move by the Chinese government to impose restrictions on climbing permits in Tibet. In a nutshell, the authorities on that side of the Himalaya have announced that there will be no post-monsoon permits issued for Everest or Shishpangma this year, and only a limited number for Cho Oyu. In addition, the government is also refusing permits to any climber who has visited Pakistan in the past three years as well, causing a number of teams to alter their intended plans for this spring.

We already knew that Kilian Jornet has moved his speed record attempt to this spring, where he’ll have to contend with more crowds, and now we know why. Last year, Jornet went to Everest in the late-summer/early-fall, but ended up being turned back due to poor weather conditions. It was expected that he would probably do the same this year, as the mountain is all but deserted during those months. But, since the Chinese won’t be issuing permits for that timeframe, the mountain runner is now forced to attempt his speed record in the spring instead.

ExWeb is reporting that the change in permitting has also had an impact on climbers Adam Bielecki and Felix Berg, who were planning to attempt a new route on Cho Oyu. Both men visited Pakistan last year however, so neither is allowed to enter Tibet. Instead, they’ll now go to Annapurna in Nepal and attempt a seldom climbed route on that mountain with partners Louis Rousseau and Rick Allen.

All across the Himalaya other teams are now arriving in BC. In addition to large numbers trickling into Base Camp on Everest, others are now getting settled on Annapurna, Makalu, Dhaulagiri, and Kangchenjunga. Most have been acclimatizing in the Khumbu Valley or on smaller peaks already, and thus are arriving in good shape to start their first rotations. It won’t be long now and we’ll start to receive word of teams moving up as they begin building their high camps, fixing ropes, and generally becoming accustomed to the altitude.

Weather is already playing a part early in the season. Reports indicate that high winds have been common so far, particularly on Everest, Lhotse, and Annapurna. But, that is not unusual for this time of year, and things tend to calm down a lot as the season progresses. Right now, we’re about a month away from major summit bids, give or take a week. The plan moving forward will be to slowly acclimate to the conditions and begin preparing for the challenges ahead.

More to report soon.

* source: – Himalaya Spring 2017: Kilian Jornet Moves Up Speed Record Attempt as Chinese Play Politics with Permits

** see also: – Adam Bielecki planuje wytyczyć nową drogę na Cho Oyu.

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Himalaya Spring 2017: New Routes on Cho Oyu and Shishapangma .

Autor : Kraig Becker

Not all of the action will take place on Everest this spring. While the tallest peak on the planet always takes center stage at this time of the year, there are plenty of expeditions to other mountains to keep our eyes on in the days ahead as well, including two attempts to open new routes on Cho You and Shishapangma.

ExWeb is reporting that the four man team of Louis Rousseau, Adam Bielecki, Rick Allen, and Felix Berg have announced that they will attempt a new line along the North Face of Cho Oyu. Their plan is to start at the base of the North Wall and climb directly up to a completely untouched section of the mountain. Much of this route is reportedly unexplored and the team isn’t sure what to expect when they get there, other than that it will be extremely technical.

The 8201 meter (26,906 ft) mountain is the sixth highest mountain in the world and is often described as the “easiest” of the 8000-meter peaks. But this team will be attacking its most difficult section, as the big wall they hope to ascend is roughly 2000 meters (6561 ft) in height and requires excellent rock climbing skills to go along with the demands of high altitude mountaineering. They’ll likely have to climb in alpine style and it could potentially be quite cold there. The North Face sees very little sunshine and even in the spring it can see temperatures well below freezing.

Meanwhile, Stefan Nestler has the scoop on another major expedition that has just left for the Himalaya. David Goettler is joining forces with Hervé Barmasse to attempt a new route along the South Face of Shishapangma in Tibet. Goettler attempted this same route last year with Ueli Steck, but the two were turned back in their attempt. This season, he is feeling much more confident about their chances.

The two climbers joined Steck in the Khumbu Valley for acclimatization training in February and will return to that region to tune up for the expedition again. They’ll spend another two weeks there prior to crossing over to Tibet to begin the climb. They’ll trek throughout the area and even warm up on Island Peak (6180 m/20,275 ft) before jumping across the border to begin.

Last year, Goettler and Steck were turned back on the 8027 meter (26,335 ft) Shishpangma due to bad weather. This year, the team is hoping for improved fortunes with better all around conditions. They should have already arrived in Kathmandu as I write this, and will be preparing to head out on their acclimatization treks soon.

Add both of these expeditions to your lists of ones to follow this spring. It is shaping up to be an interesting time in the Himalaya for sure.

* source: – Himalaya Spring 2017: New Routes on Cho Oyu and Shishapangma

** see also –

Adam Bielecki planuje wytyczyć nową drogę na Cho Oyu.

Za kilka dni Adam Bielecki wraz Rickiem Allenem, Felixem Bergiem i Louisem Rousseau wyruszy w Himalaje, gdzie zamierza zdobyć nową drogą Cho Oyu (8201 m n.p.m.).

Swój nowy projekt opisuje w wywiadzie dla Gazety Wyborczej:

Celem Polsped Cho Oyu Expedition 2017 jest wytyczenie nowej drogi na szóstej co do wysokości górze świata, czyli Czo Oju [8201 m n.p.m.]. Wybraliśmy ponaddwukilometrową północną ścianę. Wiedzie przez nią jedna droga, wytyczona po prawej stronie przez Słoweńców w 1988 r. Wszystko na lewo to dziewiczy teren.

Dodaje dalek w rozmowie:

To 2000 m terenu nachylonego średnio pod kątem 45-50 stopni. Momentami będzie jednak o wiele stromiej. Na dole więcej jest lodu i śniegu, w górnej części zaczynają się skały. To najbardziej wymagający odcinek. Nie ujawniamy naszych dwóch pomysłów na nową drogę, bo linii nie wytycza się w domu. Staniemy pod ścianą, zobaczymy, gdzie wiszą seraki [ważące setki tysięcy ton bryły lodu często wielkości dużych bloków]. Wtedy spróbujemy znaleźć bezpieczne przejście. Nie wiemy, co nas czeka. To ekscytujące.

Cho Oyu od północy (fot. Steve Hicks/Wikipedia)

Bielecki zdradza także dalsze plany, czyli dołączenia do polskiej wyprawy, której celem jest pierwsze zimowe zdobycie K2:

Jeśli wszystko dobrze pójdzie, w zimie pojadę z polską wyprawą na niezdobyte o tej porze roku K2, ale nie żyję tym planem na co dzień. W zimie już sporo osiągnąłem, a nowej drogi na ośmiotysięczniku nie poprowadziłem. Chcę to zrobić w małym, szybkim zespole i w dobrym stylu. Opętała mnie ta myśl.

Trzymamy kciuki i czekamy na kolejne wieści!

* source: – http://outdoormagazyn.pl/2017/04/adam-bielecki-planuje-wytyczyc-nowa-droge-na-cho-oyu/

** see also – Himalaya Spring 2017: New Routes on Cho Oyu and Shishapangma .

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