Himalaya Spring 2018: Puja Ceremonies and Into the Icefall.

The spring climbing season on Everest and other big peaks in the Himalaya is proceeding on schedule. Most of the teams have now arrived in Base Camp on both sides of the mountain or will be there very shortly, and the acclimatization process is now underway. But before anyone can go up the mountain for the very first time, they must first complete an important step in the climbing process – the Puja ceremony.

Those who follow the Himalayan climbing scene closely probably already know about the importance of the Puja. During this ceremony, a Buddhist lama comes to Base Camp and performs a ritual in which he asks permission of the mountain for the climbers to safely pass up and down its slopes. The lama will also bless the climbers themselves and the gear that they are using for the expedition. This is a long standing tradition amongst the Sherpa people and most will not proceed up to the higher sections of the mountain they are on until the Puja has been completed. It is not mandatory for the western climbers to attend the ceremonies, but it is part of the Himalayan climbing experience, so most do come and take it all in.

Once the Puja has been wrapped up the teams are now free to start their climb in earnest. Several squads are at that point now, particularly on the South Side of Everest where climbers have been getting settled, making acclimatization hikes, and working on their rope skills for the past week or so. Some have ever gone into the notorious Khumbu Icefall where they’ve practiced climbing ladders and negotiating their way through that dangerous section of the climb. Reportedly, this year’s route through the icefall is as direct, quick, and straightforward as any have seen before. Hopefully this will limit the amount of time spent in that section of the climb, which is widely considered the most treacherous on the Nepali side of the mountain.

One of the first teams to pass through the Khumbu Icefall is IMG. The operator’s Team 1 went up yesterday and arrived in Camp 1 for its first rotation. Today they’ll climb higher up into the Western Cwm, before returning to C1 for a second night of rest there. It’s all part of the plan to slowly get their bodies accustomed to the altitude over the next few weeks. British guide Tim Mosedale is leading his team into the icefall today too and they will make their way up to C1 as well. He reports that so far, the route doesn’t seem all that busy or crowded, although that will change as more climbers arrive in BC and start heading up the mountain.

Meanwhile, the Adventure Consultants have made their first foray into the icefall as well, but mostly just to scout the route and prepare themselves for the crossing. They’ll actually head up to Camp 2 in a few days time, starting their acclimatization process too.

Finally, The Himalayan News is reporting the numbers for the 2018 season in terms of climbing permits issued. According to officials, 649 permits have been issued this year for 22 peaks across Nepal. That includes 316 foreign climbers and 20 Nepalese on Everest, which is down some compared to last year. Additionally, the numbers for the other big peaks look like this: Annapurna I 1, Dhaulagiri I 26, Lho Tse 88, Makalu 27, Manaslu 8 and Kangchenjunga 42. A lone Korean climber on Annapurna is especially of interest.

That’s it for now. More news to come soon I’m sure.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: –Himalaya Spring 2018: Puja Ceremonies and Into the Icefall

** see also: – Trekking – posts on my site :

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : GOKYO, KALA PATTAR and EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK (19 days).

Everest Base Camp – CLASSIC treks. / Version polish and english /

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : EVEREST HIGH VALLEY – Travel Guide. /Version english/

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Historic No-Oxygen Climbing Team Returns to Nepal 40 Years Later.

While the teams up in Everest Base Camp and on other mountains in the Himalaya continue to get settled in for the climbing season ahead, an historic reunion was taking place in Kathmandu. That’s where the surviving members of the first team to summit Everest without the use of bottled oxygen joined one another to celebrate their achievement 40 years after they changed the paradigms of mountaineering forever.

The expedition took place back in 1978 and consisted of 12 members, of which 8 are still alive. They include mountaineering legends Reinhold Messner and Peter Habeler, as well as their support team consisting of Wolfgang Nairz, Helmut Hagner, Hanns Schell, Robert Schauer, Oswald Ölz and Raimund Margreiter. The four members of the squad who have since passed include Horst Bergmann, Josl Knoll, Reinhard Karl and Franz Oppurg.

40 years ago when this team gathered on Everest to attempt to climb the world’s highest mountain without the use of oxygen, the thought of going to the summit without wearing a mask and oxygen tank was pretty much unthinkable. It was thought at the time that man simply couldn’t exist at those altitudes without bringing their own oxygen supply. The entire team proved this theory to be wrong by putting Messner and Habeler on the summit without using supplemental O’s.

Messner has long been a proponent of climbing under the “fairest means” possible, which to him means leaving the oxygen tanks behind. He also laments the commercialization of Everest in general, calling the current state of affairs on the mountain “tourism,” and not climbing.

During the 1978 expedition, most of the climbers did summit, although Messner and Habeler were the only ones to do it without oxygen. Then successfully topped out on May 8. Bergmann, Schauer and Wolfgang climbed Mt Everest on May 3 while Ölz and Karl stood atop the peak on May 11, with Oppurg following along on May 14. Margreiter, Hagner and Schell were forced to turn back due to poor weather, while Knoll abandoned his attempt when his oxygen mask stopped working.

The entire team – now all in their 70’s – is currently traveling in the Khumbu Valley where they are visiting some hospitals damaged in the 2017 earthquake. They’ll also spread the ashes of famed mountaineer Norman Dyhenfurth who passed away at the age of 99 last year, before attending a special function held in their honor by the Nepal Mountaineering Association back in Kathmandu.

A major salute to this group of men from The Adventure Blog. They truly changed the way we see high altitude mountaineering and pushed the envelope in terms of what humans can do in the big mountains.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Historic No-Oxygen Climbing Team Returns to Nepal 40 Years Later

** see also: – Trekking – posts on my site :

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : GOKYO, KALA PATTAR and EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK (19 days).

Everest Base Camp – CLASSIC treks. / Version polish and english /

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : EVEREST HIGH VALLEY – Travel Guide. /Version english/

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Himalaya Spring 2018: Adrian Ballinger Goes for Cho Oyu-Everest Double Header.

It continues to be an interesting and busy spring season in the Himalaya, where teams are now steadily filing in to Base Camp on both sides of Mt. Everest as they begin the long process of acclimatization. As reported last week, the Icefall Doctors have completed the route through the Khumbu Icefall on the South Side, and the way is now clear for teams to go all the way up to Camp 2. Meanwhile, on the North Side, the teams are getting settled and shuttling gear to Advanced Base Camp further up the mountain.

Typically it takes a few days for most of the teams to get settled into place and a rest is often in order prior to beginning the actual climb. The first few days in BC are often spent polishing climbing skills and taking short hikes around the area, before setting a schedule to move further up the mountain. On the Nepali side of Everest, a number of teams will make their first acclimation rotation on another nearby peak, thus limiting the number of times the teams have to pass through Khumbu Icefall.

Ahead of the start of true climbing operations on Everest comes some interesting news of things we can expect in the days and weeks ahead this year. For example, I conducted an interview with Alpenglow owner and head guide Adrian Ballinger last week that was posted over at Gear Junkie. In that interview, Ballinger talked about a wide array of topics, but especially his plans for this season. Adrian will lead a team of climbers on a potential Himalayan double-header, making rapid ascents of both Cho Oyu and Everest. To do this, he and the other members of the team have been acclimating prior to leaving for Tibet by using oxygen tents back home, a process that has proven to be very successful in recent years.

Beyond that, Ballinger also told me that he would be climbing with bottled oxygen this year. The past two seasons he concentrated on getting a no-O’s summit of Everest, making that dream a reality in 2017. But, he says that he didn’t enjoy those climbs and remembers very little of the expeditions on the top third of the mountain. This year, it will be like discovering the route all over again. In the interview, he also shares his thoughts on low cost operators, the evolving environment on Everest, and much, much more. It is definitely worth a read and you can check it out here.

Ballinger isn’t the only one going for two summits this season, as two other squads are looking to complete an Everest-Lhotse traverse. The first of those will be attempted by Tenjing Sherpa, who wants to complete that expedition in memory of his climbing partner Ueli Steck, who perished in the Himalaya while preparing for that climb last year. The duo of Horia Colibasanu and Peter Hamor are also looking to make the same climb. Meanwhile, Willie Benegas and Matt Moniz will also attempt an Everest-Lhotse double-summit, but not the traverse.

There will be plenty of other good stories to follow in the days ahead, including some interesting climbs taking place on other peaks throughout the region. For now though, most of the teams are just finding their place and haven’t even truly begun their expeditions yet. Stay tuned for more updates in the days ahead.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Himalaya Spring 2018: Adrian Ballinger Goes for Cho Oyu-Everest Double Header

** see also: – Trekking – posts on my site :

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : GOKYO, KALA PATTAR and EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK (19 days).

Everest Base Camp – CLASSIC treks. / Version polish and english /

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : EVEREST HIGH VALLEY – Travel Guide. /Version english/

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The Adventure Podcast Episode 14: The Toughest Adventures in the World.

Episode 14 of The Adventure Podcast is now available to download from your favorite podcast source, including Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, and Spotify. As usual, you an also stream it online or finding it attached to this blog post.

In this week’s episode we open with our usual adventure news segment, talking about the Paris-Roubaix cycling race last weekend, some interesting Everest stories to follow this season, and an update on the Barkley Marathons. Then we delve deep into our main topic, during which Dave and I share our picks for the toughest adventures on the planet. As usual, we wrap things up with some gear reviews.

If you like what you hear, drop us some feedback on Facebook, Twitter, or by email. And as always, thanks for listening.

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/r92v4-8f0823?from=yiiadmin&skin=1&btn-skin=103&share=1&fonts=Helvetica&auto=0&download=0&rtl=0

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – The Adventure Podcast Episode 14: The Toughest Adventures in the World

** see also: – Trekking – posts on my site :

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : GOKYO, KALA PATTAR and EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK (19 days).

Everest Base Camp – CLASSIC treks. / Version polish and english /

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : EVEREST HIGH VALLEY – Travel Guide. /Version english/

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The Adventure Podcast Episode 13: Talking Everest and Himalayan Climbing with Alan Arnette.

I’m happy to announce that Episode 13 of The Adventure Podcast is now available to download from all of the usual places – including Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, and Spotify. As usual, I’ve also embedded the audio into this post for those who would like to listen to it here. You can also stream it directly online by clicking here.

This week we welcome our first guest to the podcast. My co-host Dave Adlard and I sit down and chat with Alan Arnette about the upcoming spring climbing season in the Himalaya, with a lot of focus on Everest in particular. Alan is one of the best resources around when it comes to talking about mountaineering, and he always provides interesting insights and perspectives. Of course, we also start the show with adventure news including a sad story from the Volvo Ocean Race, news about the environment, and an impressive new record for the most vertical feet skied in a single day. And as always, we wrap up the show with some gear talk with information on a new budget camera from GoPro, our thoughts on Oru Kayaks, and much, much more.

If you’d like to offer any feedback about this episode in particular or the show in general, you can find us on Facebook, Twitter, and by email. We’d love to hear what you think. Thanks for listening!

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/nuj48-8e98c2?from=yiiadmin&skin=1&btn-skin=104&share=1&fonts=Helvetica&auto=0&download=0&rtl=0

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – The Adventure Podcast Episode 13: Talking Everest and Himalayan Climbing with Alan Arnette

** see also: – Trekking – posts on my site :

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : GOKYO, KALA PATTAR and EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK (19 days).

Everest Base Camp – CLASSIC treks. / Version polish and english /

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : EVEREST HIGH VALLEY – Travel Guide. /Version english/

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Himalaya Spring 2018: A Pair of Sherpas Eye New Summit Records on Everest.

The 2018 Himalayan climbing season is still ramping up, but we’re starting to learn about some important stories that we’ll be watching closely in the weeks to come. Yesterday I shared a report that a Chinese double-amputee will attempt to climb from the South Side this spring, and today we have news that two Sherpas are aiming for impressive summit records for both male and female climbers on Everest.

The Himalayan Times is reporting that both Kami Rita Sherpa and Lhakpa Sherpa will both attempt to break their own records for most ever summits on the world’s highest peak. Both are departing for Base Camp soon with the hopes of reaching the top at some point this spring. If they are successful, it will be the 22nd time on top of the mountain for Kami Rita and the 9th time for Lhakpa.

For Kami Rita, this would break a tie that he currently holds with Apa Sherpa and Phurba Tashi Sherpa, but even if successful he says he won’t be done yet. He tells The Times that he wants to climb Everest 25 times before his career is done. He is 48 years old and made his first summit at the age of 24. He also has successful expeditions to K2, Cho You, Lhotse, and Annapurna on his resume too.

For her part, Lhakpa stands alone amongst women climbers with 8 summits to her name already. But this year she hopes to extend that streak to 9. She first climbed Everest back in 2000. The mother-of-three is expected to arrive in Kathmandu (she lives in the U.S.) on April 6 and will begin making her way to EBC shortly there after. She hopes to climb the mountain at least 10 times across her career as well.

Most climbers are lucky to ever get one shot at climbing Everest, and those that do usually don’t want to go through it again. Obviously it is a job for these two Sherpas, but they also have to want to continue climbing to go back so many times. They clearly have a passion for Everest, and we’ll see them back on the mountain again this spring. Hopefully they’ll both reach the summit once again.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source: – Himalaya Spring 2018: A Pair of Sherpas Eye New Summit Records on Everest

* Related Links :

– Tenzing Norgay – The most famous Sherpa. /Version polish and english/

–  Edmund Hillary- Everest legend /Version polish and english/

– Everest Climbing Legend Missing On Baruntse.

– Apa Sherpa’s new Everest record: summit number 18.

** see also: – Trekking – posts on my site :

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : GOKYO, KALA PATTAR and EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK (19 days).

Everest Base Camp – CLASSIC treks. / Version polish and english /

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : EVEREST HIGH VALLEY – Travel Guide. /Version english/

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Himalaya Spring 2018: Double Amputee to Attempt Everest, Teams in the Khumbu.

The spring climbing season is slowly but surely getting underway in the Himalaya. Droves of climbers are now arriving in Kathmandu and preparing to head out to various mountains across Nepal and Tibet. And while there isn’t a whole lot of news to share just yet, things are ramping up nicely and reports on the season ahead are beginning to trickle in.

Take for example this story from The Himalayan Times about a double-amputee climber from China who is preparing for his fifth attempt on Everest this year. 69-year old Xia Boyu will attempt the world’s highest peak from the South Side in Nepal, after the Supreme Court of that county struck down controversial new rules regarding disabled climbers. That has freed up Xia to make his attempt this spring.

The Chinese man first attempted Everest way back in 1975 when his team reached a point 250 meters (820 feet) below the summit where poor weather halted their climb. They were stuck there for three nights before they could head down. When they did, Xia loaned his sleeping bag to a teammate who has taken ill and needed assistance, but in doing so he contracted frostbite in his legs that resulted in the double amputation. Since then, he has attempted Everest on three other occasions, with his expeditions in 2014 and 2015 being cancelled due to the collapse of the icefall and the earthquake. In 2016, he reached 100 meters (328 feet) beneath the summit before poor weather once again turned him back.

Meanwhile, the article also indicates that another double amputee that we’ve been following closely – Hari Budha Magar – will now make his attempt on Everest in the spring of 2019 instead. Magar had been set to climb this season, but Nepal’s new rules through off his schedule, so he’s now forced to wait until next year instead.

Elsewhere, other expedition teams are now en route to Everest Base Camp, including the Adventure Consultants who made their flight to Lukla today and will now begin the trek to EBC. They should probably reach Everest sometime next week, although they’ll get occasional views on the trail while en route. Similarly, IMG has two groups in the Khumbu who are currently acclimatizing in the Khumbu Valley but should reach Base Camp in a few days too, while 79-year old Carlos Soria is on his way to Dhaulagiri in search of his 13th 8000-meter peak.

As you can see, things are about to get very interesting. We’ll likely see more teams arriving in the days ahead, and we’re just on the verge of the season kicking into high gear. Plenty more news and updates to follow soon. Stay tuned.

Autor : Kraig Becker

* source:  –  Himalaya Spring 2018: Double Amputee to Attempt Everest, Teams in the Khumbu

** see also: – Trekking – posts on my site :

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : GOKYO, KALA PATTAR and EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK (19 days).

Everest Base Camp – CLASSIC treks. / Version polish and english /

Trekking in Nepal Himalaya : EVEREST HIGH VALLEY – Travel Guide. /Version english/

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