30th anniversary of the first Annapurna winter ascent.

On 3 February 1987, Polish climbers Jerzy Kukuczka and Artur Hajzer made the first winter ascent of Annapurna I.

Jerzy kukuczka – climbing season 1987

1987 — Annapurna I – first winter ascent

After his early November climb on Manaslu, Jurek and Artur Hajzer summited Annapurna North Face on February 3, 1987. Hajzer returned to the mountains with Kukuczka already in September that same year. That’s when they made a first ascent of the East Ridgeon Shisha Pangma (Summit on September 18, 1987).

* source: – http://winterclimb.com/climbing-base/item/3-jerzy-kukuczka

Artur HajzerJerzy Kukuczka’s partner

When you look for a phrase to describe Artur Hajzer, one of the first that comes to mind is ‘Jurek Kukuczka’s partner.’ Even though their first expedition was not successful, after Lhotse Hajzer felt much more secure.

Artur Hajzer, Wanda Rutkiewicz i Jerzy Kukuczka, Annapurna 1987

Artur Hajzer, Wanda Rutkiewicz and Jerzy Kukuczka, Annapurna 1987

“I started believing in myself. I realised that my first steps were analogous to what Jurek had been doing a few years back. Eventually, I felt convinced that the Lhotse failure had not determined it all and the next time – as proven by Jurek’s career – would be better,” Hajzer recalled years later. And it was better, together with Jerzy Kukuczka.

“How about going on an expedition with me? I need a partner. How about that?”

“I am all for it, on spec”, answered Elephant to Kukuś.

“It was very elevating to Artur, he was very pleased. Jurek Kukuczka offered Artur that if he had organised an expedition to Manaslu and a winter expedition to Annapurna, they would climb together. And so it happened, and that is the reason Artur decided not to go with us to climb K2 via the Magic Line route,” recalls Janusz Majer.

“The Manaslu (8,156m) expedition was the most difficult of all our – mine and Jurek’s – successful expeditions. It took place in autumn 1986. We were to attempt the south face of Annapurna (8,091m) in the same season,” wrote Hajzer. On 03 February 1987 they made their first winter ascent together to the summit of an eight-thousander.

Another expedition they went on together was a summer expedition to Shishapangma in August 1987, during which they established a new route on the western ridge. The same year, Artur made another attempt on the south face of Lhotse during an international expedition organised by Krzysztof Wielicki. The expedition was a failure. In 1988, he accompanied Jurek Kukuczka, this time ascending the west Annapurna via a new route. A year later he returned for the third time to the south face of Lhotse. That time, the international expedition was organised by the Kukuczka’s ‘greatest rival’ – Rainhold Messner.

“After that expedition I came to a conclusion that another attempt would be a waste of time,” Artur writes in Attack of Despair. That is why he did not join Kukuczka during his attempt.

“It was clear that Artur had equalled his master and his own ambition took the floor. He wanted to bring his own mountaineering projects to life,” recalls Janusz Majer.

….. more – Artur Hajzer – Ice Leader.

** see also:

–   Jerzy Kukuczka – famous Polish climber /Version polish and english/

–   Polish famous climbers – The golden decade of Polish Himalayan mountaineering.

Winter Manifesto of Krzysztof Wielicki – Manifest zimowy Krzysztofa Wielickiego /Version polish and english/

Polish winter expedition to K2, 2002/3 /Version polish and english/

Ice Warriors not give up – HiMountain winter expedition to Broad Peak – 2008/09. HiMountain wyprawa zimowa Broad Peak – 2008/09. /Version english and polish/

Polish-Italian winter expedition to Shisha Pangma (8027m), 2005 /Version polish and english/

Polish winter expedition 1980 – First winter ascent of Everest, part 1

Polish winter expedition 1980 – First winter ascent of Everest, part 2

Polish winter expedition 1980 – First winter ascent of Everest, part 3

Polish winter expedition 1980 – First winter ascent of Everest, part 4

… the first winter ascent of the south face of annapurna i, 1987-1988
https://www.himalayanclub.org/…/the-firstwinterascent-of-the-so…

Annapurna I : Climbing, Hiking & Mountaineering : SummitPost
http://www.summitpost.org/annapurna-i/150258

Jerzy Kukuczka Ascents :

Alps

1973, 19 July – Aiguille du Moine. First polish ascent on Aureille-Fentren Route. Team: Jerzy Kukuczka, Marek Łukaszewski.

1973, 22 July – La Pell, Massiw Vercors. First polish ascent on Parish Route. Team: Jerzy Kukuczka, Marek Łukaszewski.

1973, 6 August – Mont Blanc, E Face. Major Route. Team: Beata Kozłowska, Jerzy Kukuczka, Janusz Kurczab, Marek Łukaszewski.

1973, 12-14 August – Petit Dru, new route. Team: Jerzy Kukuczka, Wojciech Kurtyka, Marek Łukaszewski.

1975, 3-4 August – Grandes Jorasses, N Face. New Route. Team: Jerzy Kukuczka, Wojciech Kurtyka, Marek Łukaszewski.

Continue reading

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Artur Hajzer – Ice Leader.

hajzer-portretIs winter Himalayan mountaineering possible without Artur Hajzer? “Well, they say ‘in for a penny, in for a pound.’ There is a will to finish it, an urge to confirm the Polish leadership in this discipline. It is a wonderful idea and I am making it happen with passion,” he used to say. Although the Gasherbrum expedition, during which he died, took place outside of the Polish Winter Himalayan Mountaineering Project 2010-2015 (Polski Himalaizm Zimowy – PHZ), it had been well known that he went there to build up his stamina for the remaining summits which have not been climbed in winter yet. He was one of the youngest Ice Warriors and has become the eternally young Ice Leader. This article, written by Jagoda Mytych, was originally published in “n.p.m.” magazine in September 2013.

hajzer-phz

“Everyone knows one of his faces, one or a few,” wrote Izabela Hajzer about her husband and best friend. And in fact, you could really separate Artur Hajzer’s resume into a number of people. He was a top quality climber with seven eight-thousanders to his name, a successful businessman, the founding father and chief executive of a project which made the Poles start climbing eight-thousanders in winter again. Even if not all the goals he had set were accomplished successfully, he never gave up. He was well known for his endurance and perseverance as well as his wittiness and willingness to share his knowledge and experience.

Artur died on 07 July 2013 while retreating from Gasherbrum I, one of the two eight-thousanders he had planned to ascend this year to “keep fit and stay in touch with the altitude in case another winter expedition was about to take place in the coming years.” We bid him farewell on 24 July in the arch-cathedral in Katowice, the same church, in which 24 years earlier another service had been performed to commemorate Jerzy Kukuczka. Janusz Majer, not only Artur’s business partner for many years but also a friend, gave a moving speech during the funeral service.

While I was working on this text, he told me: “Everyone knows one of his faces. Just so. I think I knew them all. When you work together, there are many reasons to end friendship, but we made it. We went through a lot of twists and turns.”

Snow Elephant

Artur was born on 28 June 1962 in Silesia. He graduated from the University of Katowice with a degree in Cultural Studies but since he was a teenager, he had been active in the Silesian mountaineering circles where he had been nicknamed ‘Elephant’. When he was 14 years of age, he started climbing with the Tatra Scout Club. At the age of 16, he finished the climbing course in the Tatra mountains, so called ‘Betlejemka’. His sporty attitude could already be seen at that time. He climbed Kazalnica Mięguszowska via many routes, Ganek and other faces, and a few difficult routes in the Alps in the Mont Blanc massif, including Petit Dru and Mont Blanc du Tacul.

Mont Blanc 1981 - z arch. Artura Hajzera

Mont Blanc 1981

hajzer-mlody

Artur Hajzer’s later climbing career was closely linked to the Mountaineering Club in Katowice, which at that time was called “the best Himalayan mountaineering club in the world’, as it was the place where Jerzy Kukuczka, Krzystof Wielicki and Ryszard Pawłowski had actively been involved.

“We were one large family in the club. Our lives revolved around the club. We did not only spent time climbing rocks or mountaineering but worked together, partied together and went to concerts together. Artur was a significant individual in the club. He was one of the promising young who did not end up as ‘promising’ but actually achieved a lot by the age of 30,” recalls Janusz Majer, who had been the chairman of the club in Katowice since 1980 and is its honorary member at present.

hajzer-anorak

Hajzer was not only an above-average climber but also a savvy and talented … tailor. He would sew everything for himself and his fellow climbers, from harnesses and backpacks to articles of clothing and down jackets. It was an invaluable experience, taking into account the fact that he was then one of the pioneers of the Polish outdoors industry. He was also familiar with painting – especially at high altitude.

Artur reminisced the summer of 1982 in his book Attack of Despair. “Every day was the same. We did not let the paint rollers out of our hands from dawn till dusk. Fortunately, we spent weekends climbing rocks in the Polish Jurassic Highland, mastering our climbing form. We did not know then which mountains we were about to be tested in.”

And the same year, at the age of 20, with a trip to Rolwaling Himal region, Artur began his Himalayan adventure. The following year, he took part in an expedition to Tirich Mir (7,706m), the highest mountain of the Hindu Kush range. In 1985, he made his first attempt on the south face of Lhotse. The club expedition had already been at Camp V, when it was joined by another member of the Katowice circles – Jerzy Kukuczka.

Artur Hajzer i Rafał Hołda, Kathmandu 1982, z archi. Artura Hajzera

Artur Hajzer with Rafał Chołda, Kathmandu 1982

Regrettably, although Hajzer met his idol and future climbing partner, he lost his current partner, Rafał Chołda, who died climbing Lhotse. Artur wrote that “from the very first moment they tied and shared a rope, they walked the same path.” The expedition was unsuccessful. Almost immediately afterwards, he set out on another one – a winter expedition to climb Kangchenjunga. He reached the summit again and again faced death in the mountains. This time it was Andrzej Czok who lost his life.

Jerzy Kukuczka’s partner

When you look for a phrase to describe Artur Hajzer, one of the first that comes to mind is ‘Jurek Kukuczka’s partner.’ Even though their first expedition was not successful, after Lhotse Hajzer felt much more secure.

Artur Hajzer, Wanda Rutkiewicz i Jerzy Kukuczka, Annapurna 1987

Artur Hajzer, Wanda Rutkiewicz and Jerzy Kukuczka, Annapurna 1987

“I started believing in myself. I realised that my first steps were analogous to what Jurek had been doing a few years back. Eventually, I felt convinced that the Lhotse failure had not determined it all and the next time – as proven by Jurek’s career – would be better,” Hajzer recalled years later. And it was better, together with Jerzy Kukuczka.

“How about going on an expedition with me? I need a partner. How about that?”

“I am all for it, on spec”, answered Elephant to Kukuś.

“It was very elevating to Artur, he was very pleased. Jurek Kukuczka offered Artur that if he had organised an expedition to Manaslu and a winter expedition to Annapurna, they would climb together. And so it happened, and that is the reason Artur decided not to go with us to climb K2 via the Magic Line route,” recalls Janusz Majer.

“The Manaslu (8,156m) expedition was the most difficult of all our – mine and Jurek’s – successful expeditions. It took place in autumn 1986. We were to attempt the south face of Annapurna (8,091m) in the same season,” wrote Hajzer. On 03 February 1987 they made their first winter ascent together to the summit of an eight-thousander.

Another expedition they went on together was a summer expedition to Shishapangma in August 1987, during which they established a new route on the western ridge. The same year, Artur made another attempt on the south face of Lhotse during an international expedition organised by Krzysztof Wielicki. The expedition was a failure. In 1988, he accompanied Jurek Kukuczka, this time ascending the west Annapurna via a new route. A year later he returned for the third time to the south face of Lhotse. That time, the international expedition was organised by the Kukuczka’s ‘greatest rival’ – Rainhold Messner.

“After that expedition I came to a conclusion that another attempt would be a waste of time,” Artur writes in Attack of Despair. That is why he did not join Kukuczka during his attempt.

“It was clear that Artur had equalled his master and his own ambition took the floor. He wanted to bring his own mountaineering projects to life,” recalls Janusz Majer.

On 24 October 1989, Jerzy Kukuczka fell of the south face of Lhotse and died. Artur Hajzer gave up climbing for a long time.

“It took me 15 years to get over it,” that is all he told me about that incident and switched off for a while. He looked as if he was not talking about something in the past but processing news that had just arrived. When he returned to Lhotse under the Polish Winter Himalayan Mountaineering Project, he said that it was ‘a conversation with ghosts.’

Rescuing and rescued

1989 was as equally tragic to Polish Himalayan mountaineering as 2013. In 1989, five eminent climbers died in an avalanche on Lho La pass while climbing Mount Everest: Eugeniusz Chrobak (expedition leader), Zygmunt Andrzej Heinrich, Mirosław ‘Falco’ Dąsal, Wacław Otręba and Mirosław Gardzielewski. The only survivor was Andrzej Marciniak, suffering from snow blindness while awaiting rescue. Hajzer was in Kathmandu at that time. With no hesitation he set about organising a complicated rescue mission from China, as it was the only possible way.

“At that time, people were protesting in Tiananmen Square. Borders were tightly shut. The American Embassy needed to exert pressure. To organise the rescue mission was probably more difficult than to pull it off. But I got instructed by Janusz Majer that either I would do something or it was done and dusted. In such moments, there is really no room to debate, or it is all over,” recalled Artur Hajzer.

“It seemed to me that Artur was the only person able to organise a rescue missions under those complicated circumstances. Even though there were excellent climbers in the base camp, it was impossible to approach from our side because of the avalanche danger. The only option left was unconventional. It was a challenge to Artur, the quintessence of his way of life. He started acting immediately. He was talking to Messner. Messner was talking to the Italian ambassador who was playing tennis with the Russian ambassador the following day. It was all about getting to the Chinese and get their permission for the mission,” said Janusz Majer.

Akcja ratunkowa po Andrzeja Marciniaka, 1989, z archi. A. Hajzera

Akcja ratunkowa po Andrzeja Marciniaka, 1989, z archi. A. Hajzera

For a daring rescue mission on Mount Everest Artur received the Polish Olympics Committee Fair Play Award. 20 years later, Andrzej Marciniak died while climbing in the Tatras. When Hazjer was asked about it, he emphasised that the most important aspect of it was that he had managed to give him those extra 20 years.

Not only did Hajzer recue people but was also rescued by them. In 2005, on Broad Peak, he broke his leg at almost 8,000m. Piotr Pustelnik, who was climbing with him then, led the rescue mission. In February 2008, he was taken by an avalanche on the south ridge of Ciemniak in the west Tatras. He managed to stay close to the surface and thanks to a well-organized TOPR mission, he was rescued unscathed and even got a reputation of ‘always landing on his feet.’ For walking outside of the designated tourist route, the Tatra National Park board of directors gave him a symbolic disciplinary warning.

Lawina na Ciemniaku 2008

Hajzer rescued by TOPR from avalanche, Ciemniak, 2008.

“February 2008, the Tatras. Objective: to traverse the entire Tatra ridge non-stop. I am walking with three experienced Himalayan mountaineers. I feel safe. We are in our twenty second hour of walking, we are ascending Ciemniak. Artur is first and suddenly disappears. Panic stations – Piotrek is trying to get reception and notify TOPR. Darek is going downhill. Done, TOPR is notified, they are coming. Hearing the helicopter, we walk slowly down in silence. Minutes are passing. And then I got a text message from Artur: I am alive. My first thought: Artur, you are invincible. That thought is with me today as well,” recalls Tamara Styś, a Himalayan mountaineer.

Businessman

After 1989, he withdrew from active climbing and together with Janusz Majer took to business, which gave birth to a brand that became cult in the 90s – Alpinus.

“After Everest, Artur came up with this idea of 14 eight-thousanders in a year. We were supposed to have one million dollars to do it. We were sorting out permissions. The entire organisation process was well advanced. We even had business cards. In autumn 1989, when Jurek was on Lhotse, Artur and I went to lSPO to look for a sponsor for our project. We talked to a number of people, including Albrecht von Dewitz, the founder of Vaude, a huge German outdoor brand. Eventually, we did not get a sponsor for our Himalayan project but a business partner,” says Janusz Majer. “First, we sewed for Vaude and then directly for Alpinus. From Vaude we got the know-how. Our advantage was that we knew the product inside out. Our products were known to be of good quality. Even today I meet people wearing our jackets made in the 90s,” he adds.

High quality materials, advanced technologies and, at the same time, limited interest of the Polish people in the outdoor market resulted in financial difficulties of the company, leading to its bankruptcy. The founders were not put off, though. Hajzer and Majer’s new project was another brand which was more affordable to the customer. HiMountain products are visible almost everywhere in the Polish mountains.

“We had already had experience gained during the liquidation of our first enterprise, so when we were creating HiMountain, we were trying to eliminate the root causes of our previous failure. But we had never given up on quality. Artur was very creative at work and kept following all current market trends. He knew how to build a team and come up with new projects which would attract people to participate in their implementation,” says Janusz Majer.

After 15 years in business, Artur realised that ‘he could not live peacefully without mountains.‘ He returned to climbing in 2005. First, almost instantly, he went to climb Broad Peak with Piotr Pustelnik and then Dhaulagiri with Robert Szymczak.

Winter expeditions leader

Artur’s business approach can be traced in the way the Polish Winter Himalayan Mountaineering Project 2010-2015 functions, which, according to Artur Hajzer, has been born out of a need to convince PZA to fund expeditions in the highest mountains.

“The fact that the project exists depends 90% on office and managerial work and one day I should really write what it looks like from behind the desk,” Artur used to joke.

And it looked like this. On 14 November 2009, 3 potential Himalayan mountaineers showed up in his office: Arek Grządziel, Jacek Czech and Irek Waluga. The next day was the deadline for funding applications.

“We knew PZA would not give a penny for a regular route climb, even in winter, if the success were not guaranteed. Robert Szymczak and I had just been refused financial support for a winter Broad Peak expedition 2008/2009. It was then when I came up with this idea that I would draft a project which would not be about climbing via regular routes but winter expeditions in the years to come,” recalled Hajzer.

The seed took root and in May 2010, already under the Polish Winter Himalayan Mountaineering Project 2010-2015, an expedition was organised to climb Nanga Parbat. Artur reached the summit with Robert Szymczak and during the second attack, Marcin Kaczan, one of the younger members of the team, ascended to the summit. ‘The young’ proved themselves again during the Elbrus Race. Andrzej Bargiel and Ola Dzik finished the race in record time. Continue reading

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part4. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part4.

Winter expedition starts! The expedition is going to operate from December 2011 to March 2012 and climb via classic route leads from the west side and in the upper parts goes through the so-called “Japanese Couloir”, situated in the highest part of the north-west face. This route is the aim of the expedition, whose main task is to ascend in winter for the first time in history the eleventh highest mountain in the world.


Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011_2012 – route

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 8,068 m led by Artur Hajzer ,

Artur Hajzer

the team : Adam Bielecki, Agnieszka Bielecka, Janusz Gołąb.

Report of January 27, 2012, Friday

Adam Bielecki after spending a night in camp 1.

  • Report of January 27, 2012, Friday
  • Wind at 6,000 m above sea level – 30 km/h, at 7,000 m above sea level – 45 km/h (yesterday at 6,000 m it blew with 45 km/h)
  • Cloudiness 100%; clouds’ level – 6,200 m above sea level
  • No snowfall (approx. 15 cm of snow fell at night)
  • Temperature in the base camp is -20°C (yesterday at 6,000 m it was -30°C)

Yesterday at 4:30 PM local time, Adam Bielecki together with two high altitude porters, Ali and Shaheen, established camp 1 at 5,930 m above sea level. Today at 6 AM local time Artur and Janusz have set off to transport a part of deposit to camp 1 and tomorrow they are going to make a reconnaissance of a route towards camp 2. Today Adam, Shaheen and Ali have descended to the base camp at approximately 2 PM.

Adam describes yesterday’s set off in the following way:

We set off at 6:40 AM and already at 9:30 AM, after a fast march, we reached the place, where we left our deposit two days ago. It turned out that the deposit place was only 30 minutes away from the so-called lower plateau, through which our route led. The route was not very difficult despite the cracks covered with snow. However, the next glacial barrier turned out to be difficult in terms of finding one’s way and very dangerous – each of us fell into a crack at least ones and Ali even experienced a 4-meter fall into one of them. A route through numerous brittle snow bridges and ice walls led us to the upper plateau. Its terrain seemed technically easy – almost flat snow surface, however, it turned out that the plateau was transected with very wide, parallel cracks that forced us to weave our way and follow our footsteps back in order to walk around the cracks. It was impossible to walk around one of them, thus we had to walk down to its bottom (approx. 40 m) and search for an exit on the other side. We managed to find it after approx. 300 m of walking on the bottom of the crack!

Weather conditions were gradually worsening during the day, what basically meant increasingly stronger wind. Camp 1 was reached at approx. 4:30 PM; we put up a tent while copying with a very strong wind. In practice it meant a constant fight with possible frostbites; after every single activity we had to warm up our fingers. At approx. 6:00 PM we could rest in our sleeping bags; we were too exhausted to eat.

Although today in the morning our footsteps have been partly covered with snow, GPS has helped us to find our way back without problems. At approx. 11:00 AM, halfway through the lower plateau, we have met Janusz and Artur, given them the GPS with the marked route to camp 1, wished them luck and after three hours reached the base camp; on our way we have also rigged the ropes next to two especially nasty cracks.

At the time of writing this report (4:40 PM), Artur and Janusz are approx. one hour away from camp 1.

Saved from an unplanned bivouac by a gps

In one of our first reports we described the icefall: how it changed, how difficult it was and that we covered 70% of the road at this stage. However, we were wrong. As it turned out, we covered only 30% of it and the rest was equally difficult. The difficulty did not lie with rubble or seracs; the main problem was to find a way through the gigantic crevasses. The team consisting in Bielecki, Sadpara and Baig that on 26th January established camp 1 showed great strength and determination.

On 27th January Janusz Gołąb and me (Artur Hajzer) followed them. We set off, according to the rules, at 6 AM. Adam informed us via radio that the route leading to camp 1 had been long and exhausting and that probably we would fail to make it to camp 1, but if we planned to do so, we had to take with us a light assault tent and be prepared for a bivouac. We felt insulted. We would not make it? By following a route? By following their footsteps? What was going on? Was Adam pulling my leg?

We met Adam’s descending team between the icefalls at approx. 11:30 AM. Adam went on talking: “Guys it’s far away! It may happen that you won’t manage to get there. I’ll give you my GPS.” And he gave it to us. We took it with a slight idea about how to use it and continued walking. We were ascending while Adam, Ali and Shaheen were descending. We walked … and walked … and walked … and walked between the blocks of seracs, in ice canyons and between various crevasses. Unfortunately, on the hard patches of the upper plateau weak traces of crampons of Adam’s team were invisible. We could not follow their traces. There were also no tracers, because at this stage Adam’s team had already used all of them and they did not have a possibility to mark the entire route. The hike was getting complicated. The route was meandering often into the opposite direction than the presumed camp.

At approx. 4:00 PM the things got serious. We realized that the day was coming to an end and the camp was nowhere to be seen. Moreover, we were not sure if we were on the right track. The only things left were the GPS and necessity to speed up our pace. The GPS showed only a thin green line (the route marked by Adam) and a white triangle (us). The picture kept on rotating, but as long as the triangle was on the green line we felt safe. At 5:00 PM it grew dark and the GPS indicated that we were not too far away from the camp. We started to run regardless of crevasses that we mostly managed to jump over. Once my body fell into an abyss, but Janusz successfully blocked the rope, I got out and we continued the run. It got dark. We stared at the GPS. Adam told us over the radio how to zoom in the picture and use the GPS to show us the camp in a straight line. We zoomed in. According to the GPS, the camp was 200 m away. However, we could not modify the setting of the GPS so that it showed the camp in the straight line. We were running round in circles – it went without saying that it was an aimless activity. At 6:30 PM it was completely dark. We pored over the GPS. We stopped to move, wet PrimaLoft® overalls lost their heating properties; we started to shiver. We used the GPS by means of a tip of an ice axe or bare fingers. One minute – Janusz, one minute – me. Adam told us to enter the menu and use “find.” The GPS was misty; I could not read the small letters on the screen. Janusz took over the device and also failed to locate “find.” It was getting colder and colder; I warmed up my fingers. Janusz claimed that we could manage to dig a snow pit. We had gas and some food. I zoomed in Adam’s route on the GPS showing that the camp was 48 m away from us. I slowly followed the GPS’ directions and Janusz went after me. I heard Janusz: “It’s there, I can see it on the right!” We found the camp. It was 7:20 PM. We reached the camp – I notified the base camp. In the base camp – where since the last two hours the situation was also tense – everyone relaxed. We put up a tent and everything was fine. In the morning we started to descend to the base camp and it took us an entire day. Taking into account this terrain, it did not matter whether we were going up or down; the pace was almost the same. The route was difficult and far regardless the direction. The situation is completely different in summer. In winter the glacier is more “open.”

All in all, we have camp 1 – so much exhaustion, fear and work and it is only the first camp. What is going to happen at higher altitudes?! For the main fight is to take place above 7,000 m. During our stay in camp 1 we could have a look at a pass leading to camp 2. There is also an open glacier. Hmm … what will happen?

Artur Hajzer


Base camp at the foot of GI, January 30, 2012

Good weather for the summit attempt.

Cloudiness 30%

Temperature -20°C

Wind – weak S/W

No snowfall

Tomorrow Adam Bielecki, Ali and Shaheen are going to leave the base camp in order to try to establish camp 2. Hajzer-Gołąb team is going to act according to their progress. The weather during these days is good the second year in the row. Jet stream moved over the south Pakistan. At 8,000 m above sea level the wind blows with 50 km/h. On 1st February the weather is supposed to be exceptionally good – sunny and without wind. We would not be surprised if other teams attempted the summit and succeeded. However, we would like to remind you that our strategy included attempts at the end of February and the beginning of March. Winter tactics is a roulette, but we believe in our assumptions.

* Source : – http://polskihimalaizmzimowy.pl/

* Previous story :

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part3. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part2. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part1. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

** see :

Polish winter expedition to Broad Peak 2010/11. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Broad Peak 2010/11.

HiMountain winter expedition to Broad Peak – 2008/09 – part 21. HiMountain wyprawa zimowa Broad Peak – 2008/09 – cz.21. /Version english and polish/

Ice Warriors not give up – HiMountain winter expedition to Broad Peak – 2008/09. HiMountain wyprawa zimowa Broad Peak – 2008/09. /Version english and polish/

– 2007 Winter Nanga Parbat: It’s over – http://www.mounteverest.net/news.php?id=15523

Polish winter expedition to K2, 2002/3 /Version polish and english/

Polish-Italian winter expedition to Shisha Pangma (8027m), 2005 /Version polish and english/

Winter Manifesto of Krzysztof Wielicki – Manifest zimowy Krzysztofa Wielickiego /Version polish and english/

Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12 – cz.4.

Relacja 27.01. 2012 piątek

  • Relacja 27.01. 2012 piątek
  • Wiatr na 6000 m n.p.m. – 30 km/h, na 7000 m n.p.m.- 45 km/h (wczoraj na 6000 45 km/h)
  • Zachmurzenie 100% pułap chmur 6200 m n.p.m.
  • Opad brak (w nocy spadło ok 15 cm)
  • Temperatura w bazie minus 20*C (wczoraj na 6000 minus 30*C)

Wczoraj o 16:30 czasu lokalnego Adam Bielecki wraz z dwoma tragarzami wysokogórskimi Alim i Shaheenem założyli obóz pierwszy na wysokości 5930 m n.p.m. Dzisiaj o 6 rano czasu lokalnego Artur i Janusz wyszli przenieść część depozytu do obozu pierwszego i jutro zrobić rozpoznanie drogi w kierunku obozu drugiego. Adam, Shaheen i Ali zeszli dzisiaj około 14:00 do bazy.

Adam opisuje wczorajsze wyjście następująco:
Wyruszyliśmy o 6:40 rano i już o 9:30 po bardzo szybkim marszu osiągnęliśmy miejsce złożonego dwa dni wcześniej depozytu. Miejsce depozytu okazało się być położone zaledwie pół godziny drogi od tak zwanego dolnego plateau, którym wiodła dalsza droga. Droga ta była niezbyt trudna, pomimo przysypanych śniegiem szczelin. Dopiero następna bariera lodowcowa okazała się trudna orientacyjnie i bardzo niebezpieczna – każdy z nas przynajmniej raz wpadł do szczeliny, a Ali zaliczył czterometrowy lot w głąb jednej z nich. Niezliczona ilość kruchych mostów śnieżnych, oraz ścianek lodowych doprowadziła nas do górnego plateau. Jego teren wydawał się łatwy technicznie – praktycznie płaska, śnieżna powierzchnia, jednakże jak się okazało była ona poprzecinana bardzo szerokimi, równoległymi szczelinami, co zmuszało nas do niekończącego kluczenia i wracania po własnych śladach celem obejścia tych szczelin. Jedna z nich okazała się nie do ominięcia, co zmusiło nas do zejścia na jej dno (około 40 m) i szukania wyjścia po drugiej stronie. Udało się to po około 300 metrach marszu dnem szczeliny!

Warunki pogodowe w ciągu dnia sukcesywnie się pogarszały, co oznaczało przede wszystkim coraz silniejszy wiatr. Obóz I osiągnęliśmy około godziny 16:30, namiot rozbijaliśmy przy bardzo silnym wietrze. W praktyce oznacza to nieustającą walkę z ryzykiem odmrożeń, po każdej najdrobniejszej czynności musieliśmy zadbać o rozgrzanie palców. Koło 18:00 bardzo zmęczeni mogliśmy odpocząć opatuleni śpiworami, na jedzenie byliśmy zbyt zmęczeni.
Dzisiaj rano pomimo tego, że zasypało część naszych śladów, GPS pomógł nam sprawnie odnaleźć drogę powrotną. Około godziny 11:00 spotkaliśmy w połowie dolnego plateau, podchodzących do góry Janusza i Artura, przekazaliśmy im GPS z zapisem drogi do obozu I, życzyliśmy powodzenia i po trzech godzinach dotarliśmy do bazy, po drodze poręczując jeszcze dwie szczególnie nieprzyjemne szczeliny.

W momencie pisania relacji (16:40) Artur i Janusz znajdują się około godziny drogi od obozu pierwszego.

Około 18.30 czasu lokalnego Artur j Janusz szczęśliwie dotarli do jedynki. Spędzą tam noc, i jutro – o ile pogoda pozwoli – będą chcieli wyjść wyżej na rekonesans w kierunku planowanego obozu drugiego.

GPS ratuje przed niespodziewanym biwakiem

W jednej z pierwszych relacji, opisywaliśmy icefall: jak bardzo się zmienił, jak bardzo jest trudny i że pokonaliśmy około 70% drogi na tym etapie. Myliliśmy się, jak się okazało pokonaliśmy wtedy zaledwie 30% a w dalszej części drogi trudności nie spadały. Jednakże trudnością nie było rumowisko, zwaliska seraków, głównie trudności skupiały się na wyszukaniu drogi pomiędzy monumentalnych rozmiarów szczelinami. Dużą siłą i determinacją wykazał się zespół Bielecki, Sadpara, Baig, który 26.01 założył obóz pierwszy.

27.01. Janusz Gołąb i ja (Artur Hajzer)ruszyliśmy za nimi. Wystartowaliśmy przepisowo o godzinie 6 rano. Adam zakomunikował nam przez radio, że droga do obozu pierwszego jest tak długa i wyczerpująca, że raczej nie dojdziemy, a jeśli mamy taki plan to na wszelki wypadek powinniśmy zabrać ze sobą, lekki namiot szturmowy i liczyć się z biwakiem. Odebraliśmy tę sugestię jako afront. Jak to my mamy nie dojść? I to po wytyczonej już trasie? Po ich śladach? O co chodzi? Adam kpi czy o drogę pyta?

Schodzący zespół Adama spotkaliśmy pomiędzy lodospadami około 11:30. Adam znowu swoje: „Chłopaki jest daleko! Może się zdarzyć, że nie dojdziecie. Dam wam GPS.” I dał. Wzięliśmy ten GPS bez większego pojęcia jak go używać i ruszyliśmy dalej. My w górę, a Adam , Ali i Shaheen w dół. I szliśmy… szliśmy… szliśmy i…. szliśmy, pomiędzy blokami seraków, w lodowych kanionach, pomiędzy różnej szerokości szczelinami. Niestety na twardych połaciach górnego plateau wątłe ślady po zębach raków Adama i ekipy przestały być widoczne. Nie mogliśmy liczyć na ślady poprzedników. Nie było też traserów bo na tym etapie zespołowi Adama, już ich zabrakło, i nie mieli możliwości oznaczenia całej drogi. Dalsza wędrówka komplikowała się. Droga prowadziła kilkusetmetrowymi zakosami, często w przeciwnym kierunku niż domniemany obóz.

Około godziny 16:00 zrobiło się poważnie Dotarło do nas, że dzień się kończy a obozu ani widu ani słychu. Nie mieliśmy też pewności czy jesteśmy na szlaku. Został nam tylko ten GPS i konieczność zdecydowanie przyspieszonego kroku. A w GPSie tylko cienka zielona kreska (zaznaczona przez Adama trasa) i biały trójkącik (my). Jakoś się ten obrazek kręci wokół ale dopóki trójkącik jest na zielonej linii to czujemy się bezpiecznie. Godzina 17:00 zmierzcha GPS wskazuje, że do obozu nie jest już daleko. Zaczynamy biec nie bacząc na szczeliny, które mniej lub bardziej skutecznie przeskakujemy. Raz mój tułów wpada w czeluść ale Janusz skutecznie blokuje mnie liną wychodzę i zasuwamy dalej. Robi się ciemno. Wpatrujemy się w GPS. Adam instruuje nas przez radio jak zrobić zbliżenie i generalnie jak posłużyć się GPSem by wskazał kierunek na obóz w linii prostej. Robimy zbliżenie. Obóz znajduje się według wskazań GPSa w promieniu 200m. Nie potrafimy jednak przestawić GPSa żeby wskazał drogę do obozu w linii prostej. Kręcimy się w kółko, nie trzeba dodawać, że bezskutecznie. 18:30 kompletna ciemność. Ślęczymy nad GPSem. Przestajemy się ruszać, mokre primalofty tracą właściwości grzewcze, dopadają nas dreszcze, GPSa obsługujemy końcówką czekana lub gołymi palcami. Jedna minuta Janusz, jedna minuta ja. Adam z bazy mówi nam, żeby wejść do menu i w funkcję „znajdź”. GPS zamglony, nie mogę odczytać małych literek na ekranie. GPS przejmuje Janusz w funkcję „znajdź” nie udaje się wejść. Jest coraz zimniej, rozgrzewam palce. Janusz uważa, że damy radę wykopać jamę śnieżną. Mamy gaz i jakieś żarcie. Zbliżam trasę Adama na GPS, który wskazuję, że obóz powinien się znajdować 48 metry od nas. Idę powolnym krokiem za wskazaniami GPS’a, Janusz za mną. Słyszę Janusza: „Jest, widzę, po prawej!” znaleźliśmy obóz. Jest 19:20. Mamy obóz – melduję do bazy. W bazie – gdzie od ostatnich dwóch godzin też było dość nerwowo – ciśnienie opada. Rozbijamy namiot i wszystko jest w porządku. Rano schodzimy do bazy niemal cały dzień. W tym terenie jest to bez znaczenia czy się idzie w górę czy w dół, tempo niewiele się różni. W każdą stronę jest trudno i daleko. Sytuacja różni się bardzo od tej samej drogi w lecie. W zimie lodowiec jest bardziej „otwarty” – prezentuje.

Koniec końców mamy obóz I, tyle wysiłku, strachu i pracy a to dopiero obóz pierwszy. Co będzie wyżej?! Wszystko ma się przecież rozegrać powyżej 7000. Będąc w „jedynce” przyjrzeć się mogliśmy drodze na przełęcz do obozu II. Tam też otwarty lodowiec. Hmmm… Co to będzie? Co to będzie?

Artur Hajzer

Baza pod GI 30.01.2012

Dobra pogoda na atak szczytowy.

Zachmurzenie 30%

Temperatura -20*C

Wiatr słaby S/W

Brak opadów.

Jutro wychodzi z bazy Adam Bielecki z Alim i Shaheenem z planem założenia obozu II. Zespół Hajzer-Gołąb będzie reagował odpowiednio do ich postępów.

Już drugi rok z rzędu panuje w tych dniach bardzo dobra pogoda. Jet Stream odsunął się nad południowy Pakistan. Wieje słabo – na 8000m n.p.m. do około 50 km/h. 1lutego ma być wyjątkowo dobra pogoda – „bezwietrzna” i słoneczna. Nie bylibyśmy zaskoczeni – gdyby inne wyprawy zaatakowały szczyt i jak rok temu odniosły sukces. Naszą wybraną strategią – przypominamy – są ataki na przełomie lutego i marca. Zimowa taktyka to jednak ruletka, mimo to wierzymy w nasze założenia.

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Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part3. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part3.

Winter expedition starts! The expedition is going to operate from December 2011 to March 2012 and climb via classic route leads from the west side and in the upper parts goes through the so-called “Japanese Couloir”, situated in the highest part of the north-west face. This route is the aim of the expedition, whose main task is to ascend in winter for the first time in history the eleventh highest mountain in the world.


Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011_2012 – route

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 8,068 m led by Artur Hajzer ,

Artur Hajzer

the team : Adam Bielecki, Agnieszka Bielecka, Janusz Gołąb.

Film report from road to Askole

Watch a film – report from road to Askole , 15.01.2012 – Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011_2012 .

* film shows the difficulties that were on this road

The caravan on its way to the base camp

Watch a film showing our caravan on its way to the base camp at the foot of Gasherbrum.

January 25, 2012 Base Camp at the foot of Gasherbrum I

Wind up to 10 km/h
Temperature -20°C
Cloudiness 100%
Clouds’ height 6,000 m
No snowfall
There are only old patches of snow and snowdrifts in the base camp.

We have already been uphill. On 24th January we planned to establish camp I. The weather was perfect: sunny and freezing. All five of us set off with rather light backpacks, just in case. We did not plan to rig the ropes, however, we took 200 m of ropes expecting that a six-kilometer icefall in winter could cause some problems. We were right. All that we had heard about the long and technically challenging icefall turned out to be true. There were screes, cracks, ice walls, sharp ridges and overhung seracs; the final part of plateau was completely covered – perhaps due to a small earthquake or other reasons. All things considered we weaved our way through this labyrinth, had our hearts in our mouth and failed to reach camp I at 5,900 m above sea level.

We covered 70% of the route on the glacier, up to 5,700 m above sea level. Then, rubble on the plateau has stopped us, but we hope to overcome it within a couple of days. On our way back to the base camp we rigged the ropes on more difficult parts of the route with 150 m of rope. We also used 50 tracers to mark the route. During the first night, after we had come back to the base camp, we dreamt about cracks and brittle ice bridges on the icefall. To be frank, this part of the route in winter is an ultimate horror. One has to be constantly attached to a rope and be extra cautious. It is not going to be easy; if the snow falls and covers our traces, we will have to mark the route anew. We got a rap on the knuckles.

See more photos on gallery>>

Regards,
Agna, Artur, Adam i Janusz

* Source : – http://polskihimalaizmzimowy.pl/

* Previous story :

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part2. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part1. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

** see :

Polish winter expedition to Broad Peak 2010/11. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Broad Peak 2010/11.

HiMountain winter expedition to Broad Peak – 2008/09 – part 21. HiMountain wyprawa zimowa Broad Peak – 2008/09 – cz.21. /Version english and polish/

Ice Warriors not give up – HiMountain winter expedition to Broad Peak – 2008/09. HiMountain wyprawa zimowa Broad Peak – 2008/09. /Version english and polish/

– 2007 Winter Nanga Parbat: It’s over – http://www.mounteverest.net/news.php?id=15523

Polish winter expedition to K2, 2002/3 /Version polish and english/

Polish-Italian winter expedition to Shisha Pangma (8027m), 2005 /Version polish and english/

Winter Manifesto of Krzysztof Wielicki – Manifest zimowy Krzysztofa Wielickiego /Version polish and english/

Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12 – cz.3.

Zapraszamy do filmowej relacji “Droga do Askole”

“Droga do Askole” – zobacz film pokazany powyżej, w części EN.

Karawana do bazy

Zapraszamy do obejrzenia filmu pokazującego jak wyglądała karawana do bazy pod Gasherbrumem – zobacz film pokazany powyżej, w części EN.

25.01 2012 Baza pod Gasherbrumem I

Wiatr do 10 km/h
temp. –20*C
zachmurzenie 100%
pułap chmur 6000 m.
bez opadów
W bazie tylko stare płaty śniegu i stare zaspy.

24.01. pokonywanie Ice fallu w kiernku obozu pierwszego

Jesteśmy po pierwszym wyjściu w góry. 24 stycznia zamierzaliśmy założyć obóz I. Pogoda była idealna: Słonecznie i mroźnie. Wyszliśmy całą piątką, na wszelki wypadek z dosyć lekkimi plecakami. Nie planowaliśmy zakładać poręczówek, wzięliśmy jednak 200 m lin spodziewając się, że sześciokilometrowy ice fall w warunkach zimowych może stanowić nie lada problem. Tak też się stało. Wszystko co słyszeliśmy o tym długim i męczącym technicznie lodospadzie okazało się prawdą. Były zawaliska, szczeliny, lodowe ścianki, ostre granie i wiszące nad głową seraki, końcowe plateau uległo całkowitemu zawaleniu być może miało tu ostatnio miejsce małe trzęsienie ziemi, albo też po prostu zawaliło się samo z siebie. W związku z powyższym, kluczyliśmy na lodowcu jak w labiryncie z duszą na ramieniu i nie osiągnęliśmy obozu I na 5900 mnpm.

Pokonywanie Plateau

Pokonaliśmy około 70 % drogi na lodowcu do wysokości ok. 5700 mnpm. Dalszą drogę uniemożliwiło nam gruzowisko zawalonego plateau, które mamy nadzieję pokonać w ciągu kilku dni. W drodze powrotnej do bazy, zaporęczowaliśmy trudniejsze odcinki, zużywając 150 m. liny. Zużyliśmy też 50 traserów, dla oznaczenia drogi. Pierwszej nocy po powrocie do bazy śniły nam się szczeliny i kruche lodowe mosty na ice fallu. Uczciwie mówiąc ten odcinek trasy w warunkach zimowych to istny horror. Trzeba być ciągle związanym i zachowywać dużą czujność. Na pewno nie będzie łatwo, jeśli spadnie śnieg i zasypie nasze ślady drogę wytyczać trzeba będzie na nowo. Trochę dostaliśmy po łapach.

Więcej zdjęć w galerii >>>

Pozdrawiamy,
Agna, Artur, Adam i Janusz

* Polish Himalayas – Become a Fan

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Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part2. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part2.

Winter expedition starts! The expedition is going to operate from December 2011 to March 2012 and climb via classic route leads from the west side and in the upper parts goes through the so-called “Japanese Couloir”, situated in the highest part of the north-west face. This route is the aim of the expedition, whose main task is to ascend in winter for the first time in history the eleventh highest mountain in the world.


Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011_2012 – route

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 8,068 m led by Artur Hajzer ,

Artur Hajzer

the team : Adam Bielecki, Agnieszka Bielecka, Janusz Gołąb.

A report from Jola, January 16, 2012.

A report received via a satellite telephone from a bivouac in Jola on January 16, 2012: Yesterday, i.e. on January 15, we reached Askole in jeeps. As usually, we rode with our hearts in our mouth due to abysses and other obstacles. It seemed that we did not have any chances to pass a damaged suspension bridge, but fortunately Janusz Gołąb showed his carpentry skills and repaired the bridge. We all felt a surge of pure adrenaline for the first time during this expedition!

On January 16 in the morning we continued our journey and thanks to the frozen rivers we could take a short cut. We bivouac in Jola. Our kitchen and accommodation are in mesa tents.

The temperature in Jola is -5°C, overcast sky, no rain or wind. Minimal snow cover – 3 cm!

We are doing fine. Tomorrow we plan to reach Payu.

A report received from the Gore II bivouac on January 19, 2012.

We are bivouacking in Gore II at 4,300 m above sea level. There is no snowfall; a 15 cm snow cover; cloud top height – 6,000 m; weak wind – 15 km/h; 80% cloudiness; the temperature in tents is -10°C. We have reached this place after three nights in Jola, Payu and Urdukas. We will reach the base camp in two or three days, depending on porters’ decision. The weather conditions are favourable for marching, though our porters would like it to be sunnier… On the other hand, it is warmer thanks to the clouds, i.e. -10°C at this time of the year is a rather high temperature. Military posts that we pass inspire our respect. In small huts without heating, in the middle of the glacier soldiers guard vast boarders of their country. Their situation is unenviable. From Payu we follow the Baltoro Glacier. The path is rather distinct: mounds and tracers show us the route; military telephone cables are sometime visible.

A report January 21, 2012 from the base camp at the foot of Gasherbrum.

A report dictated over a satellite telephone on January 21, 2012 from the base camp at the foot of Gasherbrum:

Today in the afternoon we have reached Gasherbrum BC at 5,030 m above sea level. The temperature is -20°C, the wind blows with 0-10 km/h, there is approximately half a meter of snow cover on Concordia and on the moraine – up to 30 cm. During the entire day, the sky was overcast and it cleared up in the evening.
During the last two days we had a lot of luck – weather conditions were favourable for marching and our porters decided that we were going to reach Sharinj. Therefore, today there have been only four hours of marching left to get to the base camp. Unfortunately, due to the overcast sky we could see neither K2 nor the “Shiny Face” of Gasherbrum IV.
Today, having reached the base camp, we put up our tents and get access to our warm clothes that we on the bottom of our bags carried by the porters. We plan to spend the next two days on establishing the base camp – our home for the next two months. We have to put up a mess tent, a storehouse, a toilet, etc.
In the evening out efforts were rewarded – at sunset we could see our mountain in all its magnificence!

Greetings from Gasherbrum BC!
Agna, Artur, Adam and Janusz

* Source : – http://polskihimalaizmzimowy.pl/

* Previous story :

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part1. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

** see :

Polish winter expedition to Broad Peak 2010/11. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Broad Peak 2010/11.

HiMountain winter expedition to Broad Peak – 2008/09 – part 21. HiMountain wyprawa zimowa Broad Peak – 2008/09 – cz.21. /Version english and polish/

Ice Warriors not give up – HiMountain winter expedition to Broad Peak – 2008/09. HiMountain wyprawa zimowa Broad Peak – 2008/09. /Version english and polish/

– 2007 Winter Nanga Parbat: It’s over – http://www.mounteverest.net/news.php?id=15523

Polish winter expedition to K2, 2002/3 /Version polish and english/

Polish-Italian winter expedition to Shisha Pangma (8027m), 2005 /Version polish and english/

Winter Manifesto of Krzysztof Wielicki – Manifest zimowy Krzysztofa Wielickiego /Version polish and english/

Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12 – cz.2.

Relacja 16.01.2012 z Jola

Relacja podyktowana przez telefon satelitarny z biwaku Jola, 16.01.2012:
Wczoraj, 15 stycznia dojechaliśmy jeepami do Askole. Jak zwykle była to jazda z duszą na ramieniu, z powodu mijanych przepaści i innych przeszkód. Wydawało się, że uszkodzony most wiszący nie da nam szans na przejazd, ale na szczęście Janusz Gołąb wykazał się talentem ciesielskim i naprawił most. Zaliczyliśmy wszyscy pierwszy na wyprawie zastrzyk adrenaliny!

16 stycznia rano wyruszyliśmy w dalszą drogę, na szczęście dzięki zamarzniętym rzekom mogliśmy pomaszerować na skróty. Na biwak dotarliśmy do Jola. Kuchnię i nocleg mamy urządzone w namiotach typu mesa.

W Jola panuje temperatura -5 stopni, zachmurzenie całkowite, zero opadów i zero wiatru. Skąpa pokrywa śnieżna – 3 cm!

U nas wszystko w porządku. Jutro zamierzamy dojść do Payu.

Relacja 19.01.2012

Relacja podyktowana z biwaku Gore II 19.01.2012:

Jesteśmy na biwaku w Gore II na wysokości 4.300 m n.p.m. Opadów brak, sniegu leży 15 cm, pułap chmur 6.000 m, wiatr słaby 15 km/h, zachmurzenie 80%. temperatura w namiocie -10 stopni C.
Dotarliśmy tu po trzech noclegach w Jola, Payu i Urdukas. W zależności od decyzji tragarzy w bazie będziemy za dwa do trzech dni. Warunki są sprzyjające do marszu, choc nasi tragarze życzyliby sobie więcej słońca… Z drugiej strony dzięki chmurom jest cieplej – minus 10 stopni C o tej porze roku to wysoka temperatura.

Nasz szacunek budzą mijane po drodze posterunki wojska. W małych lepiankach na środku lodowca, bez ogrzewania, żołnierze strzegą spornej granicy swego kraju. Nie zazdrościmy im tej sytuacji.
Od Payu idziemy lodowcem Baltoro. Scieżka jest dość wyraźna , drogę wskazują nam kopczyki i trasery, czasem widoczny jest wojskowy kabel telefoniczny.

Relacja z 21.01.2012 z bazy pod Gasherbrumem

Relacja podyktowana przez telefon satelitarny 21.01.2012 z bazy pod Gasherbrumem:

Dzisiaj po południu dotarliśmy do Gasherbrum BC na wysokości 5030 m n.p.m. Temperatura powietrza to minus 20 stopni C, wiatr 0-10 km/h, na lodowcu Concordia jest około pół metra śniegu, a na morenie od 0 do 30 cm. Cały dzień niebo było całkowicie zachmurzone, dopiero wieczorem się przejaśniło.
W ciągu poprzednich dwu dni mieliśmy dużo szczęścia – panowały warunki sprzyjające do marszu i wczoraj nasi tragarze zadecydowali, że dojdziemy aż do Sharinj. Dlatego dzisiaj zostało nam tylko cztery godziny marszu do bazy. Niestety, ze względu na całkowite zachmurzenie nie zobaczyliśmy ani K2, ani Świetlistej Ściany Gasherbruma IV.
Dzisiaj, po dotarciu do bazy rozbiliśmy nasze osobiste namioty i dostaliśmy się do ciepłych ubrań, które były na dnie worków niesionych przez tragarzy. Przez następne dwa dni zamierzamy urządzać bazę – nasz dom na najbliższe dwa miesiące. Czeka nas przygotowanie mesy, magazynu, toalety, itp. Wieczorem spotkała nas nagroda za trudy ostatnich dni – o zachodzie wyjrzało słońce i nasza góra odsłoniła się w całej swej okazałości!

Pozdrawiamy z Gasherbrum BC!
Agna, Artur, Adam i Janusz

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Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part1. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012, part1.

Gasherbrum I (8,068 m a.s.l.), Hidden Peak or K5 – is the highest from the group of seven Gasherbrums. After K2, it is the second highest peak of Karakorum. The peak belongs to the group of four out of fourteen eight-thousanders that have not been conquered in winter yet.

Winter expedition starts!  The expedition is going to operate from December 2011 to March 2012 and climb via classic route leads from the west side and in the upper parts goes through the so-called “Japanese Couloir”, situated in the highest part of the north-west face. This route is the aim of the expedition, whose main task is to ascend in winter for the first time in history the eleventh highest mountain in the world.


Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011_2012 – route

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 8,068 m led by Artur Hajzer ,

Artur Hajzer

the team : Adam Bielecki, Agnieszka Bielecka, Janusz Gołąb.

We are preparing for the set off.

The expedition leaves from Poland at the end of December. We plan to set off towards the base camp from Skardu on approximately January 14 and then the first reports from Pakistan are going to appear on our blog.
Meanwhile, our preparations are coming to a close. Expedition’s cargo has already been sent and with the help of 70 porters it has reached the place of the future base camp on the Baltoro Glacier at 5,200 m a.s.l. We focus only on the training and direct preparations before the set off. We kindly invite you for the press conference in Warsaw on December 20 – information about the venue is going to be published in a separate announcement.

Preparations of the expedition in Pakistan are over.

Preparations of the expedition in Pakistan are over and at dawn on January 15 we are leaving Skardu in jeeps and going to Askole, from where on January 16 a caravan is going to set off towards the base camp. According to reports, conditions in the mountains on our caravan’s route are very good. There is no snow till Urdukas and fortunately the temperature does not fall below -10°C.


Reaching the Baltoro Glacier’s toe should take one or at most two days and then we are going to travel on the glacier for approximately five days (70 km).

The plan of reaching the base camp looks as follows:

  • January 16 – Jola (or Payu)
  • January 17 – Payu (or Urdukas)
  • January 18 – Urdukas (or Gore II)
  • January 19 – Gore II (or Concordia)
  • January 20 – Concordia (or Sharing or the Base Camp)
  • January 21 – Sharing (or the Base Camp)
  • January 22 – Deadline for reaching the Base Camp

KThe caravan is going to consist in Artur Hajzer, Janusz Gołąb, Adam Bielecki, Agnieszka Bielecka and approximately 20 porters; moreover, two of our high altitude porters are going to join it:

  • Ali Muhhamed Sadpara
  • Shaheen Baig from Shinshal.

Artur and Ali (our high altitude porter) in Skardu

On our way to the base camp we plan to join our forces with international expedition of Gerfried Goschl. We will try to provide current information concerning our progress.

More photos see on gallery!

Regards,

GI Team – 2011-12

Film report from Skardu, 01/14/2012.

Have a look at the relationship of film to Skardu.

Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12 – cz.1.

Przygotowujemy się do wyjazdu.

Wyprawa wyruszy z Polski z końcem grudnia. Do bazy wystartować planujemy z miejscowości Skardu ok. 14 stycznia i wtedy pojawią się na naszym blogu pierwsze relacje z Pakistanu.
Tymczasem kończymy przygotowania. Cargo wyprawy zostało już wysłane i przy pomocy 70 porterów dotarło w miejsce przyszłej bazy na lodowcu Baltoro na wys. 5200 m n.p.m. My możemy poświęcić sie treningowi i bezpośredniemu przygotowaniu startowemu. Zapraszamy na konferencję prasową w Warszawie w dniu 20 grudnia – o miejscu powiadomimy osobnym komunikatem.

Przygotowania wyprawy w Pakistanie dobiegły końca.

Przygotowania wyprawy w Pakistanie dobiegły końca i 15 stycznia o świcie wyruszamy jeepami ze Skardu do Askole, skąd następnego dnia (16 stycznia) ma wyruszyć karawana w kierunku bazy wyprawy. Warunki w górach na trasie naszej karawany według doniesień są bardzo dobre. Aż do Urdukas nie ma śniegu, a temperatura na szczęście nie spada poniżej -10 *C.

W busie do hotelu w Skardu

W ciągu jednego, najwyżej dwóch dni podejdziemy do czoła lodowca Baltoro, następnie około pięciu dni będziemy przemieszczać się po lodowcu (70 km).

Plan podejścia do bazy wyprawy wygląda następująco:

16.01 – Jola (lub Payu)
17.01 – Payu (lub Urdukas)
18.01 – Urdukas (lub Gore II)
19.01 – Gore II (lub Concordia)
20.01 – Concordia (lub Sharing, lub Baza)
21.01 – Sharing (lub Baza)
22.01 – Ostateczny termin dotarcia do Bazy

Karawana będzie się składać z naszej czwórki (Artur Hajzer, Janusz Gołąb, Adam Bielecki, Agna Bielecka) i około 20 tragarzy, ponadto udział w niej wezmą nasi dwaj tragarze wysokościowi:

Ali Muhhamed Sadpara
Shaheen Baig z Shinshal.

Z Alim na bazarze w Skardu (w sklepie jego kolegów)

W czasie karawany do bazy planujemy łączyć siły z międzynarodową wyprawą Gerfrieda Goschla Postaramy się na bieżąco informować o naszych postępach.

Więcej zdjęć w galerii wyprawy – zapraszamy!

Filmowa relacja ze Skardu, 14.01.2012

Zapraszamy do obejrzenia filmowej relacji ze Skardu… zobacz film powyżej.

Z taternickim pozdrowieniem,

Ekipa GI – 2011.12

* Source : – http://polskihimalaizmzimowy.pl/

* Previous story :

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

** see :

Polish winter expedition to Broad Peak 2010/11. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Broad Peak 2010/11.

– HiMountain winter expedition to Broad Peak – 2008/09 – part 21. HiMountain wyprawa zimowa Broad Peak – 2008/09 – cz.21. /Version english and polish/

– Ice Warriors not give up – HiMountain winter expedition to Broad Peak – 2008/09. HiMountain wyprawa zimowa Broad Peak – 2008/09. /Version english and polish/

– 2007 Winter Nanga Parbat: It’s over – http://www.mounteverest.net/news.php?id=15523

– Polish winter expedition to K2, 2002/3 /Version polish and english/

– Polish-Italian winter expedition to Shisha Pangma (8027m), 2005 /Version polish and english/

– Winter Manifesto of Krzysztof Wielicki – Manifest zimowy Krzysztofa Wielickiego /Version polish and english/

* Polish Himalayas – Become a Fan

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Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011/2012.

Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 8,068 m led by Artur Hajzer ,

Artur Hajzer

the team : Adam Bielecki, Agnieszka Bielecka, Janusz Gołąb.

2011/12 Winter Gasherbrum I team members’ resume :

Artur Hajzer is a Polish mountaineer best known for the first winter ascent of Annapurna on February 3, 1987 together with Jerzy Kukuczka. He was member of winter expedition – 2006/07 Winter Nanga Parbat and HiMountain winter expedition to Broad Peak – 2008/09! Artur Hajzer has six main 8000er summits to his name, several via new routes (Manaslu’s NE face in 1986, Shisha’s east ridge in 1987) and the first winter climb of Annapurna on Feb. 3, 1987. Plus, he also summited Annapurna East (8010m) via a new route up the SE face in 1988. All these climbs were done together with Kukuczka, without O2 or Sherpa support. Artur also attempted Lhotse South Face three times reaching 8200 m in 1985, 8300 m in 1987 and 7200 m (alpine style) in 1989. He is also known as organizer of a “thunderbolt” rescue operation on Everest’s West Ridge for Andrzej Marciniak in 1989.

Adam Bielecki – 28 years old. Mountaineering Club in Cracow. He comes from Tychy but lives in Cracow. Psychology alumnus at Jagiellonian University. He has been climbing in the mountains for 13 years. Leader od several expedition into various mountains on 5 continents. Winner of the award in the Kolosy 2000 competition for making at the age of 17, as the youngest in the world, lone ascent on Khan Tengri 7,010 m in the alpine style. In the autumn 2011 he conquered the fifth summit of the world, Makalu 8,463 m, without the use of oxygen.

Agnieszka Bielecka – 33 years old. Mountaineering Club in Wrocław. Base camp leader; she is in charge of functioning of the base camp, management of workers and resources, but first and foremost she is /Adam’s sister/ responsible for PR, satellite reports and contact with Poland. Tourist guide. She has climbed both in summer and winter in the Tatra Mountains and the Alps. She summited five-thousanders of trekking nature. She has broken her altitude record on the slopes of Lenin Peak, while ascending the Razdelnaya Peak 6,100m. She is a photographer and an author of travel articles. Sailing is her another passion – she has sailed the Atlantic Ocean in an 8-meters yacht. She speaks Hindi.

Janusz Gołąb – 43 years old. Mountaineering Club in Gliwice. He started climbing in 1986. Member of the legendary “Wunder team” that at the turn of the century made a series of supreme alpine climbs in the history of Polish mountaineering. The climbs included winter ascent of the Troll Wall in Norway, GrandesJorasses belonging to the Mount Blanc massif and the Eiger in the Alps inter alia. Extreme climbs in Alaska and Greenland were also a part of it. Participant of the famous expedition to the mountains of Patagonia – “Pepsi na Max.” His crowning alpine achievement was to set a new route on the great wall of Kedar Dome in the Garhwal Himalayas. Janusz Gołąb is a winner of a prestigiousKolosy Award; he has been awarded a Medal for Outstanding Achievements in Sport.

Supporting team in Poland:

Izabela Hajzer – co-ordiantion – iza@himountain.pl
dr Robert Szymczak, MD – remote medical care, rescue logistics
Witold Bąk and Sebastian Kabała – reception of photo and film transmissions; materials processing
Grzegorz Chwoła and Joanna Kudelska – PR
Patrycja Konopka – Facebook profile handling
Marek Karnecki – web administrator

About the expedition

The Gasherbrum Group is located in Karakorum, between the Baltoro Glacier in the west, the Gasherbrum Glacier in the north and the Urdok Glacier in the east. Names of the five peaks encompassed by this group come from the words rgashabrum, which in Balti mean either “Beautiful Mountain” or “Shining Wall”. Gasherbrum I (8,068 m a.s.l.), Hidden Peak or K5 – is the highest from the group of seven Gasherbrums. After K2, it is the second highest peak of Karakorum. The Americans, Andrew Kauffman and Pere Schoening, were the first ones to conquer the mountain in 1958. Wojciech Kurtyka and Jerzy Kukuczka were the first Poles, who summited it in 1983. They climbed in alpine style via the southwest face. The peak belongs to the group of four out of fourteen eight-thousanders that have not been conquered in winter yet. The most popular classic route leads from the west side and in the upper parts goes through the so-called “Japanese Couloir”, situated in the highest part of the north-west face. This route is the aim of the expedition, whose main task is to ascend in winter for the first time in history the eleventh highest mountain in the world.


Polish winter expedition to Gasherbrum I 2011_2012 – route

* Source : – http://polskihimalaizmzimowy.pl/

** see :

Polish winter expedition to Broad Peak 2010/11. Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Broad Peak 2010/11.

– HiMountain winter expedition to Broad Peak – 2008/09 – part 21. HiMountain wyprawa zimowa Broad Peak – 2008/09 – cz.21. /Version english and polish/

– Ice Warriors not give up – HiMountain winter expedition to Broad Peak – 2008/09. HiMountain wyprawa zimowa Broad Peak – 2008/09. /Version english and polish/

– 2007 Winter Nanga Parbat: It’s over – http://www.mounteverest.net/news.php?id=15523

– Polish winter expedition to K2, 2002/3 /Version polish and english/

– Polish-Italian winter expedition to Shisha Pangma (8027m), 2005 /Version polish and english/

– Winter Manifesto of Krzysztof Wielicki – Manifest zimowy Krzysztofa Wielickiego /Version polish and english/

Zimowa wyprawa PZA na Gasherbrum I 2011/12.

Cel wyprawy :

Grupa Gaszerbrum znajduje się w Karakorum, pomiędzy lodowcem Baltoro na zachodzie, lodowcem Gaszerbrum na północy i lodowcem Urdok na wschodzie. Nazwa pięciu szczytów wchodzących w jej skłąd pochodzi od słów rgasha brum, co w języku balti oznacza “Piękną Górę” lub “Świecącą Ścianę”. Gaszerbrum I (8068 m n.p.m.), Hidden Peak lub K5 – jest najwyższym z grupy siedmiu Gaszerbrumów. Jest po K2 drugim co do wysokości szczytem Karakorum,. Pierwszymi zdobywcami góry byli w 1958 r Amerykanie Andrew Kauffman i Pete Schoening. Jako pierwsi Polacy na szczycie stanęli w 1983 r. Wojciech Kurtyka i Jerzy Kukuczka. Dokonali tego w alpejskim stylu, południowo-zachodnią ścianą. Szczyt należy do grupy czterech spośród czternastu ośmiotysięczników wciąż nie zdobytych zimą Najpopularniejsza droga klasyczna wiedzie od strony zachodniej. a górnych partiach prowadzi przez tzw. „Kuluar Japoński”, położony w najwyższej części ściany północno-zachodniej. To właśnie ta droga jest celem wyprawy, której najważniejszym zadaniem jest dokonanie pierwszego w historii wejścia zimą na tą jedenastą pod względem wysokości górę na świecie.

Uczestnicy :

Artur Hajzer – 49 lat. Klub Wysokogórski Katowice. Kierownik wyprawy. Zamieszkały w Mikołowie. Przedsiębiorca. Zdobywca 6 ośmiotysięczników w tym 3 nowymi drogami. Uczestnik 5 wypraw zimowych w Himalaje i Karakorum. Autor pierwszego zimowego wejścia na Annapurnę 8091 m. Jesienią 2011 roku zdobył piąty szczyt świata Makalu 8463 m bez użycia tlenu.

Adam Bielecki – 28 lat. Klub Wysokogórski Kraków. Pochodzi z Tychów, mieszka w Krakowie. Absolwent Psychologii UJ. Wspina się w górach od 13 lat. Leader kilkudziesięciu wypraw w różne góry na 5 kontynentach. Zdobywca wyróżnienia w konkursie Kolosy 2000 za dokonanie w wieku siedemnastu lat, najmłodszego na świecie, samotnego i w stylu alpejskim wejścia na Khan Tengri 7010m. Jesienią 2011 roku zdobył piąty szczyt świata Makalu 8463 m bez użycia tlenu.

Agnieszka Bielecka – 33 lata. Klub Wysokogórski Wrocław. Kierownik bazy, odpowiedzialna za funkcjonowanie bazy, zarządzanie pracownikami i zapasami a przede wszystkim /siostra Adama/ za PR, relacje satelitarne i kontakt z krajem. Przewodnik turystyczny. Ma na swoim koncie wspinaczki letnie i zimowe w Tatrach i Alpach. Wchodziła na pięciotysięczniki o charakterze trekkingowym. Swój rekord wysokości pobiła na stokach szczytu Lenina, wchodząc na Pik Radzielna 6100 m. Jest fotografem i autorką artykułów podróżniczych. Jej druga pasja to żeglarstwo – 8 metrowym jachtem przepłynęła Atlantyk. Porozumiewa się w języku hindi.

Janusz Gołąb – 43 lata. Klub Wysokogórski Gliwice. Wspina się od 1986 roku. Członek legendarnego tzw. “Wunder team”, który na przełomie wieków dokonał serii najznakomitszych wspinaczek o charakterze alpejskim w historii polskiego alpinizmu. Były to między innym zimowe przejścia ściany Troll Wall w Norwegii, Grandes Jorasses w masywie Mont Blanc, Eiger w Alpach. Nie brakowało ekstremalnych wspinaczek na Alasce, Grenlandii. Uczestnik głośnej wyprawy w góry Patagonii “Pepsi na Max”. Zwieńczeniem alpejskich sukcesów było wytyczenie nowej drogi na wielkiej ścianie Kedar Dome w Himalajach Gharwalu. Janusz Gołąb jest laureatem prestiżowej nagrody Kolosy; odznaczony został Medalem Za Wybitne Osiągnięcia Sportowe.

Zespół wspomagający w Polsce:

  1. Izabela Hajzer – koordynacja – iza@himountain.pl
  2. dr Robert Szymczak – zdalna opieka medyczna, logistyka ratunkowa
  3. Witold Bąk, Sebastian Kabała – odbiór transmisji fot. i filmowych, obróbka materiałów
  4. Grzegorz Chwoła, Joanna Kudelska – PR
  5. Patrycja Konopka – obsługa profilu Facebook
  6. Marek Karnecki – administrator www

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